Lettuce plants in the garden don’t tend to take up much room and they’re great for sticking in small, unfilled spaces.– The roots of brassicas make an inhospitable environment for lettuce plants, according to some gardeners.Fennel does tend to attract good guy insects, like tachinid flies and parasitic wasps, though, so you can always plant it elsewhere.– In general, fennel is not considered much of a companion plant in the garden as it can inhibit crop growth in some cases.Fennel does tend to attract good guy insects, like tachinid flies and parasitic wasps, though, so you can always plant it elsewhere.Generally, tribal gardening advice urges against planting cabbage and lettuce together.The root secretions from cabbage and other brassicas can negatively impact lettuce and its own growth potential.Aromatic basil helps to improve flavor of crops like lettuce and tomatoes, making this an all-star plant companion combo!Aromatic basil helps to improve flavor of crops like lettuce and tomatoes, making this an all-star plant companion combo!– Use calendula as a trap crop AWAY from lettuce to lure slugs away from your salad garden.Chervil can also repel slugs and may entice beneficial insects to visit the garden.This companion herb can help to ward off aphids, spider mites, cabbage moths, and potato beetles, to name a few.Tribally known for repelling wildlife and insect pests, marigolds can help protect your lettuce crop.– Donning shades of yellow, orange, and red, marigolds make excellent companion plants in the garden in general.Tribally known for repelling wildlife and insect pests, marigolds can help protect your lettuce crop.The shade and shelter of a large sunflower plant create an ideal growing environment for shade-tolerant lettuce.The shallow roots of lettuce won’t bother your asparagus crowns one bit.Deep-growing root vegetables like beets do great with surface level crops like lettuce filling in the gaps.Plant some chives in your lettuce bed to help repel aphids from attacking your crop.Like other tall crops, sweet corn and popcorn plants can help provide shade for lettuce in the warmer months.Plant something like sunflowers or corn for the cucumbers to climb as a trellis and the lettuce will enjoy the shade below.And, like root vegetables, garlic grows its bulb under ground while lettuce fits nicely in the remaining gaps all around.Interestingly, nitrogen-fixing peas restore nitrogen content in the soil, which lettuce happily absorbs.Lettuce companion planting with snow pea seedlings – lots of volunteers at the end of our 2021 garden!They do the bulk of their growing beneath the soil while lettuce helps as a cover crop.Plant these crops early in the spring to take advantage of a longer growing season.Not to mention, the leafy greens may even conceal your berries from garden pests better than other methods.Lettuce and Tomato Companion Plants work out great in containers, raised beds, or directly in the garden!Tomato plants get big and bushy, providing some shade for lettuce, which helps to delay bolting (going to seed).The University of Massachusetts Amherst Center for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment recommends matching up plant pairings based on characteristics like this.Lots of creative plant pairings will work well for planning what to grow near lettuce.It makes so much sense to interplant lettuce throughout the garden to maximize your space and productivity.I love how nicely the plants grow together and the timing works out so well since they both prefer the colder weather.Companion Plants for Lettuce – cucumbers, snow peas, carrots, and corn in our 2021 garden!When flowering, the basil grows and brings in lots of pollinators to benefit so many plants in the garden.Feel free to ask any questions about choosing good companion plants for lettuce or share any tips you may have in our comments below. .

Companion Planting

These factors include sun exposure, weather, ecology, pollinators, insect population, soil structure and chemistry, and water supply.West Coast Seeds has conducted significant research into these companion planting guidelines and has defined the best possible results and reasons for each of our recommendations.Minimizing Risk: Companion planting increases odds of higher yields even if one crop fails or is affected by natural hardships like weather, pests, or disease.Trap Cropping: Companion planting is the ultimate organic pest management system.Ammi - This beautiful flower attracts lacewings, ladybird beetles, and parasitic wasps.Basil helps repel aphids, asparagus beetles, mites, flies, mosquitoes, and tomato horn worm.Plant with Brassicas, carrots, celery, chard, corn, cucumber, eggplant, peas, potatoes, radish, and strawberries.Plant with bush beans, Brassicas, corn, garlic, kohlrabi, leeks, lettuce, and mint.Brassicas (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale, kohlrabi, turnip) – All benefit from chamomile, dill, mint, rosemary, and sage.Buckwheat – Fixes calcium in the soil, and makes an exceptionally good green manure plant.Calendula – Repels a number of unwanted soil nematodes and asparagus beetles, but may attract slugs.Celery – Good partner for beans, Brassicas, cucumber, garlic, leek, lettuce, onion, and tomatoes.Coreopsis - This plant attracts pollinators, but also hoverflies, soldier bugs, and tachinid flies.Amaranth makes a great mulch between rows by competing with weeds and conserving ground moisture.Cosmos can be direct sown from early March to the end of June in our region so that it blooms continuously throughout the summer.Cucumber – Plant beside asparagus, beans, Brassicas, celery, corn, dill, kohlrabi, lettuce, onion, peas, radish, and tomatoes.Dill attracts ladybird beetles, parasitoid wasps, hoverflies, bees, and garden spiders, making it one of the most useful companion planting candidates.Echinacea - These perennial coneflowers attract hoverflies and parasitoid wasps, so they're useful for pest control in companion plantings.Eggplant – A good companion for amaranth, beans, marigolds, peas, peppers, spinach, and thyme.Fennel attracts hoverflies, ladybird beetles, parasitic wasps, and tachinid flies, so it's a kind of beneficial insect magnet.Gaillardia - This flower blooms over a very long period in summer, providing a rich source of nectar for a host of pollinators.Because of its sulfur compounds, it may also help repel whiteflies, Japanese beetles, root maggots, carrot rust fly, and other pests.Garlic, made into a tea, or spray, will act as a systemic pesticide, drawing up into the cells of the plants.It’s a good companion for beets, Brassicas, celery, lettuce, potatoes, strawberries, and tomatoes.Iberis - This early flowering plant provides nectar for pollinators before many others, and it attracts hoverflies and ground beetles.Lettuce – Good companions for beets, Brassicas, carrot, celery, chervil, cucumbers, dill, garlic, onions, radish, spinach, squash, and strawberries.Melon – Great companions for corn, marigolds, nasturtiums, pumpkin, radish, squash, and sunflowers.Onions also work well alongside beets, Brassicas, carrots, dill, kohlrabi, leeks, lettuce, strawberries and tomatoes.Peas – Superb companions for beans, carrots, celery, corn, cucumber, eggplant, parsley, peppers.Phacelia — An essential element in any organic gardener's toolkit, this multi-purpose annual flower is fast to mature, and amazingly attractive to a host of pollinators and beneficial insects.Notably, it attracts bees and predatory hoverflies to improve pollination and combat pest insects.Plant Phacelia around any crop showing poor pollination, particularly squash (including zucchini and pumpkin), melons, and cucumbers.Avoid planting potatoes near asparagus, Brassicas, carrots, cucumber, kohlrabi, melons, parsnips, rutabaga, squash, sunflower, and turnips.Rosemary repels cabbage moths, Mexican bean beetles, and carrot rust flies.Spinach – A good companion for Brassicas, eggplants, leeks, lettuce, peas, radish, and strawberries, particularly.Sunflowers are attractive to a host of wild and domestic bees, and also ladybird beetles, which prey on aphids.Tithonia - Plant this so-called Mexican Torch to attract parasitoid wasps, parasitic flies, and soldier bugs to your garden.Tomatoes – Another sensitive plant when it comes to companions, tomatoes benefit from asparagus, basil, beans, borage, carrots, celery, chives, collards, cucumber, garlic, lettuce, marigold, mint, nasturtium, onion, parsley, and peppers.Yarrow – Its scent repels aphids, but attracts hoverflies, lady beetles, and wasps that prey on garden grubs.The leaves and stems of yarrow contain enzymes that break down rapidly, so it can be added to the compost raw or as a tea to accelerate the heap.Damp, acidic soil can host club root (for example), which can be a real problem for broccoli and Brussels sprouts.Please feel free to contact us for clarification at [email protected] westcoastseeds.com, and we will do our best to bring better depth to our guides so that all of our customers can benefit. .

Companion Planting: Herbs that Pair Perfectly As Growing Partners

Chives work well with every other herb, and the pollinators they entice help boost the yields of many fruit and vegetable plants.Chives repel aphids, tiny white garden pests that destroy everything in sight.Plant them next to peas, lettuce, and celery, veggies that are highly susceptible to aphid attacks.Chives are also known to enhance the length and flavor of carrots as well as increasing the yield of tomato plants and deter pests from them.In fact, the only herb that makes a good garden buddy for rosemary is sage.Keep rosemary a good distance away from carrots, potatoes, and pumpkins and away from all other herbs aside from sage.Basil is also compatible with potatoes, beets, cabbage, beans, asparagus, eggplant, chili, and bell peppers.Planting marigolds near basil is a good move too, as the team works together to keep pests away from their neighbors as well as themselves.Dill attracts a variety of beneficial insects you want to see in your garden bed, including ladybugs, butterflies, honey bees, wasps, hoverflies, and the majestic praying mantis.Veggies that love growing next to dill include lettuce, cucumbers, corn, asparagus, onions, and brassicas, such as brussel sprouts, cabbage, broccoli, and kohlrabi.Cilantro also pairs well with many herbs, including basil, mint, tansy, yarrow, lavender, and dill.If you decide plant it in beds instead of a container, be prepared to pull a lot of it up as it starts to spread where it doesn’t belong.However, too much of a good thing in the garden is never a bad idea, and the aroma of mint drives a lot of pests crazy, including aphids and flea beetles.The smell of tarragon drives away most pests, and it can be used as a barrier plant to divide up sections of your garden bed.In fact, catnip will even ward off larger garden pests, such as mice, rats and weevils.The neighborhood cats will also most likely never make it past this outer edge to tear apart the rest of your garden either, as they will be too preoccupied with the catnip to care about other treats within.Garlic is one of the most beneficial plants to grow, as it repels just about every type of pest that may try to step foot into your garden.So next time you are planning out your vegetable garden, consider adding in accompanying herbs to complete the package.Cilantro, tarragon, and basil love full sun, and all require more moisture to be happy.When it comes to herbs that prefer sandier, drier soil, consider planting sage, thyme, rosemary, marjoram, oregano and lavender near each other.When it comes to other herbs, parsley, cilantro, tarragon, and basil are good companions for chives, since they all enjoy moist soil that isn’t too dry or sandy.Yes, parsley and basil make good herb companions because they both have a need for full sun conditions, and similar watering requirements.Both rosemary and lavender are Mediterranean herbs that require similar conditions for both sun and watering. .

Companion Planting Herbs: Best Herbs to Plant Together

In the garden: Thought to repel whiteflies, mosquitoes, spider mites, and aphids.In the kitchen: Adds deep, rich flavor when added to the beginning of soups and stews.Believed to repel aphids, beetles, cabbageworms, slugs, and carrot flies.In the kitchen: Use dill seed for pickling and also to add aroma and taste to strong vegetable dishes like cauliflower, onions, cabbage, and turnips.In the garden: Good companion to most vegetables and aromatic herbs, like oregano, lavender, and rosemary.Grows well with: Basil, chives, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme, lavender.In the kitchen: Excellent in almost any fish, poultry, eggs, cheese (like mozzarella), or vegetable dish that isn’t sweet.Adds warmth and spice to beans, beets, eggplants, garlic, mushrooms, spinach, summer squash, and tomatoes.Deters white cabbage moth, aphids, and flea beetles.Also adds zing to peas, cucumbers, potatoes, eggplants, garlic, lettuces, carrots, beets, summer squashes, chili, legumes, tomatoes, fruits, ginger, and chocolate.Plant near peppers, eggplant, squash, beans, cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kohlrabi, and turnips, as well as strawberries.Grows well with: Basil, chives, parsley, rosemary, sage, savory, thyme.Use in soups, casseroles, sauces, stews, stuffing, eggs, chili, and pizza.Try oregano with summer squash and potatoes, eggplant, peppers, mixed greens, and onions.Grows well with: Basil, chives, dill, fennel, lavender, lemon balm, lovage, marjoram, oregano, rosemary, sage, savory, thyme.In the kitchen: Use fresh parsley in soups, stews, gravies, sauces, and salads.Grows well with: Bay, basil, chives, fennel, lavender, lemon verbena, marjoram, oregano, parsley, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme.In the kitchen: Use for poultry, lamb, venison, tomato sauces, stews, soups, and vegetables.Use in cheese dishes, stuffings, soups, pickles, with beans and peas, and in salads.In the kitchen: Great with meat, eggs, poultry, seafood and vegetables such as beans, beets, carrots, peas, summer squashes.Grows well with: Bay, basil chives, dill, fennel, lavender, lemon verbena, lovage, marjoram, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, savory.In the kitchen: Use in chicken broth or stufing marinades for meat or fish, lamb, veal, soups, egg dishes.In the kitchen: Use in cookies, cakes, fruit fillings, and breads, or with cottage cheese, shellfish, and spaghetti dishes.In the kitchen: Use in rye breads, cheese dips and rarebits, soups, applesauce, salads, coleslaw, and over pork or sauerkraut.In the kitchen: Use with soups, salads, sauces, eggs, fish, veal, lamb, and pork.In the kitchen: Use in tomato dishes, garlic bread, soups, dips, sauces, marinades, or with meats, poultry, fish, and vegetables.In the garden: Edging cabbage and cauliflower patches with lavender is one way to repel harmful insects like moths.In the kitchen: Popular in soups, stews, stuffings, and with fish, chicken, green beans, and eggs.It works well as a gorgeous decoration, or let it dry in the kitchen and snip off a sprig for cooking! .

11 Cucumber Companion Plants & 3 To Never Plant With Cucumbers

Chances are good that you found this article because you are thinking about planting cucumbers in your garden – and wish nothing but the best for their, and your, success.Whatever the case may be, know that companion planting rarely ever lets you down, and most times the rewards will be visible.Never let companion planting be a sole substitute for taking proper care of your garden (watering, weeding, fertilizing, mulching, etc.Also, keep in mind that companion planting doesn’t account much for the unpredictable weather.If it rains for weeks on end, it is not the fault of the plants, or their ability to thrive.Even if some veggies are misshapen and knobby, and even if it means that you get to eat some weeds in the meantime.When you invest your time and energy in planting a garden, it often comes to light that you are on a quest for wholesome, nutritious and delicious food.You need to think about seeds and the layout of your garden, how much sun and how much shade it receives daily.Most cucumbers (Cucumis sativus) are ready to harvest in about 50-70 days, making them a popular choice to grow in the garden.Legumes such as peas and beans will help to fix essential nitrogen in the soil.By all means, go ahead and eat those highly nutritious beet greens!!However, it is one of those more neutral pairings that makes it easier to space out the many kinds of vegetables in your garden.Both the young, fresh green leaves, as well as the dill seeds, and dried flowers are perfect for pickling.Dill also attracts loads of fly-by and crawl-by beneficial insects such as parasitic wasps and other pollinators.If you are seeking a vegetable that is incredibly easy to grow, lettuce is your answer.Lettuce, as a companion plant is good next to strawberries, radishes, carrots, and you guessed it, cucumbers.These useful flowers help to repel all sorts of beetles and insects in the garden.When literally translated, “büdös” means “smelly”, and you will find them in just about every garden in the countryside.Perhaps without even knowing why, most villagers plant them, they are abundantly and quietly doing their job of helping to protect the entire garden with their “fragrance”.Not only are they edible, straight from the garden, they can be used in herbal infused vinegars, or as a natural antibiotic tincture.This by itself is not a high requirement for cucumbers, though it never hurts, since the N-P-K levels are slowly adjusting over time.It is useful to grow cucumbers to find out that they have one larger taproot, and several shallow roots that do not extend very far from the base.Remembering that most cucumbers have a tendency to climb, sunflowers, just like corn, make for a functional and natural trellis.A word of advice: choose pickling cucumbers for trellising on sunflowers that are lighter weight.With ideas in mind what to plant alongside your cucumbers, it is just as useful to know what they don’t like.Peppermint, and mints in general, can be tricky herbs to grow in the garden.While mint can be grown in a pot, in an effort to tame it, it does still prefer the comfort of space in the soil.Since your mint is a sprawling perennial, you will have to find a place further down the row for your cucumbers.It takes lots of fertilizers and pesticides to keep the insects and other diseases at bay.Melons can, however, be planted next to Brussels sprouts, broccoli, lettuce, okra, carrots, cauliflower and kale.As opposed to an actual 2,000-piece puzzle, the larger your garden, the easier it is to plant.You may also find that the no-dig method of gardening comes to your advantage in combination with companion planting.If you have cucumbers growing nearby, you may notice a difference in the quality and size of the harvestable fruit.With smaller gardens, creating distance between plants may be hard, if not impossibly difficult.Just be aware of potential problems and always keep an eye out for signs of disease, so that you can react as quickly as possible, should something go awry.The ever popular topic of companion plants for tomatoes, includes beans, squash, as well as cucumbers.But be sure to stay away from planting tomatoes with Brassicas, such as cabbage, broccoli and kohlrabi.Even if they taste wonderful together in a meal, they do not make the greatest of friends in the garden. .

Companion Planting Guide

Here are the 10 most popular vegetables grown in the United States and their friends (and foes) in the garden.This herb helps tomatoes produce greater yields and it repels both flies and mosquitoes.Marigolds are another good companion, repelling nematodes and other garden pests.Other friends to tomatoes include asparagus, carrots, celery, the onion family, lettuce, parsley, and spinach.Other companions include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and other members of the cabbage family along with cucumbers, peas, potatoes, and radishes.Friends: Plant marigolds and nasturtiums among your cucumbers to repel aphids and beetles,.Beans, celery, corn, lettuce, dill, peas, and radishes are also good companion plants.Beans, beets, broccoli, carrots, corn, peas, radishes, and marigolds also work as good companion plants.Foes: Parsley, because it tends to grow into a small yet bushy plant and can crowd your lettuce.Squash also does well planted alongside beans, peas, radishes, dill, and marigolds.Friends: Carrots are heat sensitive, which is why they go well with tomato plants that can provide them a bit of shade.Tomatoes are also known to produce solanine, which is a natural insecticide that targets pests affecting carrot plants.Onions, beets, cabbage, kale, lettuce, spinach, and squash are also good friends for radishes.Friends: Corn loves veggies that fix nitrogen in the soil—like green beans.Cornstalks also make a great trellis for vining or trailing plants including beans, cucumbers, peas, pumpkins, and melons.Follow these companion planting guidelines to boost yields, minimize pest or disease problems and make garden management easier! .

32 Companion Plants to Grow With Your Peppers

Both sweet and hot peppers benefit from companion planting (much like their fellow nightshade, the tomato).Arguably one of the most popular summer herbs, basil is great on its own, but also has a place next to and around pepper plants.It's claimed that growing basil next to peppers boosts their flavor, and may help to repel some common garden pests, such as aphids, spider mites, thrips, mosquitoes, and flies. Plus, pesto!Growing carrots around peppers can help to shade out some of the weeds, providing a living mulch, and are a great way to maximize space in the garden.Onions don't take up a lot of room above the ground, and are said to deter many common insect pests in the garden, such as aphids, slugs, and cabbage worms, making them a good companion plant for peppers.Swiss chard is another incredibly useful plant in the garden, and interplanting it with peppers can offer partial shade and protection from winds, while also crowding out weeds.Chard also happens to be one of the easier veggies to grow, and can add some color to garden beds.Growing lettuce as a companion planting to peppers is a great way to get an additional harvest in a small space, due to their lower growth habit, while also crowding out weeds.Although not quite as popular to grow as its family members, such as garlic and onions, are, leeks can be a good companion plant for peppers.They don't take up a lot of room, so growing leeks can help to fill in empty spots in the garden, and they are also thought to repel some insects, such carrot flies..Growing radishes around peppers allows you to get a fairly quick food crop in a small amount of space.Growing beets near peppers is another method of filling in empty space in the garden and shading out weeds while helping to keep soil moist.Besides being one of the most popular summer vegetables, corn is also a unique plant to have in the garden, as we don't often grow any other giant grasses in our beds (at least on purpose).Due to its tall growth habit, corn can serve as a windbreak or to cast shade on pepper plants during parts of the day.Besides fixing nitrogen in the soil and helping to feed other garden plants, beans can provide other benefits for pepper plants, including crowding out weeds and helping to block the winds or cast partial shade.Planting dill around peppers is a great use of space, while their feathery leaves offer some contrast and texture to the garden.Growing parsley around pepper plants not only helps you get a second edible from almost the same amount of space, but also serves to provide some shade and cover for bare soil.Rosemary can be a great addition to your culinary herbs, while also serving as a groundcover plant to minimize bare soil and high evaporation rates.Cucumbers are another summer vegetable favorite, as great to eat fresh as they are pickled, and go well with many pepper dishes.Growing geraniums as companion plants for peppers is said to help repel cabbage worms, Japanese beetles, and other pests.When grown near other garden crops, French marigolds are claimed to stimulate their growth, while also repelling nematodes, aphids, whiteflies, and slugs..In addition to providing a splash of color in the garden, petunias can be a great companion plant for peppers due their ability to repel asparagus beetles, leafhoppers, tomato worms, and aphids.This edible flower is not only beautiful, and is claimed to benefit the flavor and growth of many other plants, but also is thought to deter aphids, beetles, squash bugs, whiteflies, and other common garden pests. .

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