Evaluation of the gastroprotective effect of Laurus nobilis seeds on ethanol induced gastric ulcer in rats.Al Hussaini, R. and Mahasneh, A. M.

Microbial growth and quorum sensing antagonist activities of herbal plants extracts.Influence of phenological stages and method of distillation on Iranian cultivated Bay leaves volatile oil.Awerbuck, D. C., Briant, T. D., and Wax, M. K. Bay leaf: an uncommon foreign body of the hypopharynx.Beljaars, P. R., Schumans, J.

C., and Koken, P. J. Quantitative fluorodensitometric determination and survey of aflatoxins in nutmeg.Characterization of the intracellular mechanisms involved in the antiaggregant properties of cinnamtannin B-1 from bay wood in human platelets.A., and Salido, G. M.

Cinnamtannin B-1 from bay wood exhibits antiapoptotic effects in human platelets.Buto, S. K., Tsang, T.

K., Sielaff, G. W., Gutstein, L.

L., and Meiselman, M. S. Bay leaf impaction in the esophagus and hypopharynx.Caredda, A., Marongiu, B., Porcedda, S., and Soro, C. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction and characterization of Laurus nobilis essential oil.Chaudhry, N. M. and Tariq, P.

Bactericidal activity of black pepper, bay leaf, aniseed and coriander against oral isolates.Cheminat, A., Stampf, J. L., and Benezra, C.

Allergic contact dermatitis to laurel (Laurus nobilis L.): isolation and identification of haptens.Conforti, F., Statti, G., Uzunov, D., and Menichini, F. Comparative chemical composition and antioxidant activities of wild and cultivated Laurus nobilis L. leaves and Foeniculum vulgare subsp.Chemical compositions and antibacterial effects of essential oils of Turkish oregano (Origanum minutiflorum), bay laurel (Laurus nobilis), Spanish lavender (Lavandula stoechas L.), and fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) on common foodborne pathogens.Dall'Acqua, S., Cervellati, R., Speroni, E., Costa, S., Guerra, M. C., Stella, L., Greco, E., and Innocenti, G. Phytochemical composition and antioxidant activity of Laurus nobilis L. leaf infusion.Dall'Acqua, S., Viola, G., Giorgetti, M., Loi, M.

C., and Innocenti, G. Two new sesquiterpene lactones from the leaves of Laurus nobilis.De Marino, S., Borbone, N., Zollo, F., Ianaro, A., Di Meglio, P., and Iorizzi, M.

Megastigmane and phenolic components from Laurus nobilis L. leaves and their inhibitory effects on nitric oxide production.De Marino, S., Borbone, N., Zollo, F., Ianaro, A., Di Meglio, P., and Iorizzi, M.

New sesquiterpene lactones from Laurus nobilis leaves as inhibitors of nitric oxide production.Dearlove, R. P., Greenspan, P., Hartle, D.

K., Swanson, R. B., and Hargrove, J.

L. Inhibition of protein glycation by extracts of culinary herbs and spices.Diaz-Maroto, M.

C., Perez-Coello, M. S., and Cabezudo, M. D. Effect of drying method on the volatiles in bay leaf (Laurus nobilis L.).Erkmen, O.

and Ozcan, M. M. Antimicrobial effects of Turkish propolis, pollen, and laurel on spoilage and pathogenic food-related microorganisms.Erler, F., Ulug, I., and Yalcinkaya, B.

Repellent activity of five essential oils against Culex pipiens.Ferreira, A., Proenca, C., Serralheiro, M. L., and Araujo, M.

E. The in vitro screening for acetylcholinesterase inhibition and antioxidant activity of medicinal plants from Portugal.Friedman, M., Henika, P.

R., and Mandrell, R. E. Bactericidal activities of plant essential oils and some of their isolated constituents against Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica.Gomez-Coronado, D.

J. and Barbas, C.

Optimized and validated HPLC method for alpha- and gamma-tocopherol measurement in Laurus nobilis leaves.Gomez-Coronado, D. J., Ibanez, E., Ruperez, F. J., and Barbas, C. Tocopherol measurement in edible products of vegetable origin.Gurbuz, I., Ustun, O., Yesilada, E., Sezik, E., and Akyurek, N. In vivo gastroprotective effects of five Turkish folk remedies against ethanol-induced lesions.Gurman, E. G., Bagirova, E.

A., and Storchilo, O. V.

[The effect of food and drug herbal extracts on the hydrolysis and transport of sugars in the rat small intestine under different experimental conditions].Hibasami, H., Yamada, Y., Moteki, H., Katsuzaki, H., Imai, K., Yoshioka, K., and Komiya, T. Sesquiterpenes (costunolide and zaluzanin D) isolated from laurel (Laurus nobilis L.) induce cell death and morphological change indicative of apoptotic chromatin condensation in leukemia HL-60 cells.Hot spices influence permeability of human intestinal epithelial monolayers.JIRASEK, L.

and SKACH, M. [Perioral contact eczema with eczematous stomatitis after the use of bay leaves (Laurus nobilis L.) in food.].Kaileh, M., Berghe, W.

V., Boone, E., Essawi, T., and Haegeman, G. Screening of indigenous Palestinian medicinal plants for potential anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activity.Kanat, M.

and Alma, M. H.

Insecticidal effects of essential oils from various plants against larvae of pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea pityocampa Schiff) (Lepidoptera: Thaumetopoeidae).Isolation and characterization of alkyl peroxy radical scavenging compound from leaves of Laurus nobilis.Bay leaves improve glucose and lipid profile of people with type 2 diabetes.Kilic, A., Hafizoglu, H., Kollmannsberger, H., and Nitz, S. Volatile constituents and key odorants in leaves, buds, flowers, and fruits of Laurus nobilis L. J Agric.Food Chem.Kivcak, B. and Mert, T.

Preliminary evaluation of cytotoxic properties of Laurus nobilis leaf extracts.Komiya, T., Yamada, Y., Moteki, H., Katsuzaki, H., Imai, K., and Hibasami, H. Hot water soluble sesquiterpenes [anhydroperoxy-costunolide and 3-oxoeudesma-1,4(15),11(13)triene-12,6alpha-olide] isolated from laurel (Laurus nobilis L.) induce cell death and morphological change indicative of apoptotic chromatin condensation in leukemia cells.Lingenfelser, T., Adams, G., Solomons, D., and Marks, I. N.

Bay leaf perforation of the small bowel in a patient with chronic calcific pancreatitis.Liu, M. H., Otsuka, N., Noyori, K., Shiota, S., Ogawa, W., Kuroda, T., Hatano, T., and Tsuchiya, T.

Synergistic effect of kaempferol glycosides purified from Laurus nobilis and fluoroquinolones on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.Lodovici, M., Akpan, V., Casalini, C., Zappa, C., and Dolara, P. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Laurus nobilis leaves as a measure of air pollution in urban and rural sites of Tuscany.Loizzo, M.

R., Saab, A. M., Tundis, R., Statti, G. A., Menichini, F., Lampronti, I., Gambari, R., Cinatl, J., and Doerr, H.

W. Phytochemical analysis and in vitro antiviral activities of the essential oils of seven Lebanon species.Luna-Herrera, J., Costa, M.

C., Gonzalez, H. G., Rodrigues, A. I., and Castilho, P.

C. Synergistic antimycobacterial activities of sesquiterpene lactones from Laurus spp.Maccioni, A.

M., Anchisi, C., Sanna, A., Sardu, C., and Dessi, S. Preservative systems containing essential oils in cosmetic products.Biological activity evaluation of the oils from Laurus nobilis of Tunisia and Algeria extracted by supercritical carbon dioxide.Extraction and separation of volatile and fixed oils from berries of Laurus nobilis L.

by Supercritical CO2.Matsuda, H., Kagerura, T., Toguchida, I., Ueda, H., Morikawa, T., and Yoshikawa, M. Inhibitory effects of sesquiterpenes from bay leaf on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages: structure requirement and role of heat shock protein induction.Matsuda, H., Shimoda, H., Ninomiya, K., and Yoshikawa, M. Inhibitory mechanism of costunolide, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Laurus nobilis, on blood-ethanol elevation in rats: involvement of inhibition of gastric emptying and increase in gastric juice secretion.Matsuda, H., Shimoda, H., Uemura, T., and Yoshikawa, M. Preventive effect of sesquiterpenes from bay leaf on blood ethanol elevation in ethanol-loaded rat: structure requirement and suppression of gastric emptying.Moreira, P.

L., Lourencao, T. B., Pinto, J. P., and Rall, V. L.

Microbiological quality of spices marketed in the city of Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil.Otsuka, N., Liu, M. H., Shiota, S., Ogawa, W., Kuroda, T., Hatano, T., and Tsuchiya, T.

Anti-methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) compounds isolated from Laurus nobilis.Ozcan, M. and Chalchat, J. C.

Effect of different locations on the chemical composition of essential oils of laurel (Laurus nobilis L.) leaves growing wild in Turkey.Ozcan, M. M., Sagdic, O., and Ozkan, G.

Inhibitory effects of spice essential oils on the growth of Bacillus species.Papageorgiou, V., Mallouchos, A., and Komaitis, M. Investigation of the antioxidant behavior of air- and freeze-dried aromatic plant materials in relation to their phenolic content and vegetative cycle.Puoci, F., Cirillo, G., Curcio, M., Iemma, F., Spizzirri, U.

G., and Picci, N. Molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction for the selective HPLC determination of alpha-tocopherol in bay leaves.Raharivelomanana, P.

J., Terrom, G. P., Bianchini, J.

P., and Coulanges, P. [Study of the antimicrobial action of various essential oils extracted from Malagasy plants.Comparison of chemical composition of the essential oil of Laurus nobilis L. leaves and fruits from different regions of Hatay, Turkey.Sayyah, M., Valizadeh, J., and Kamalinejad, M. Anticonvulsant activity of the leaf essential oil of Laurus nobilis against pentylenetetrazole- and maximal electroshock-induced seizures.Simic, A., Sokovic, M. D., Ristic, M., Grujic-Jovanovic, S., Vukojevic, J., and Marin, P. D.

The chemical composition of some Lauraceae essential oils and their antifungal activities.Simic, M., Kundakovic, T., and Kovacevic, N. Preliminary assay on the antioxidative activity of Laurus nobilis extracts.Skok, P.

Dried bay leaf: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage.Suganthi, R., Rajamani, S., Ravichandran, M. K., and Anuradha, C. V.

Effect of food seasoning spices mixture on biomarkers of oxidative stress in tissues of fructose-fed insulin-resistant rats.Tepkeeva, I. I., Moiseeva, E.

V., Chaadaeva, A. V., Zhavoronkova, E.

V., Kessler, Y. V., Semushina, S. G., and Demushkin, V.

P. Evaluation of antitumor activity of peptide extracts from medicinal plants on the model of transplanted breast cancer in CBRB-Rb(8.17)1Iem mice.Tilki, F. Influence of pretreatment and desiccation on the germination of Laurus nobilis L. seeds.Tinoco, M. T., Ramos, P., and Candeias, M. F.

Effects of a hexane extract from Laurus novocanariensis leaves on the ethanol metabolism of Wistar rats.Traboulsi, A. F., El Haj, S., Tueni, M., Taoubi, K., Nader, N.

A., and Mrad, A. Repellency and toxicity of aromatic plant extracts against the mosquito Culex pipiens molestus (Diptera: Culicidae).Tsang, T.

K., Flais, M. J., and Hsin, G.

Duodenal obstruction secondary to bay leaf impaction.Uchiyama, N., Matsunaga, K., Kiuchi, F., Honda, G., Tsubouchi, A., Nakajima-Shimada, J., and Aoki, T. Trypanocidal terpenoids from Laurus nobilis L. Chem.Pharm.Bull (Tokyo) 2002;50(11):1514-1516.Essential oil composition of Laurus nobilis L. of different growth stages growing in Iran.Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of Laurus nobilis essential oil composition of northern Cyprus.Yoshikawa, M., Shimoda, H., Uemura, T., Morikawa, T., Kawahara, Y., and Matsuda, H.

Alcohol absorption inhibitors from bay leaf (Laurus nobilis): structure-requirements of sesquiterpenes for the activity.Adisen E, Onder M. Allergic contact dermatitis from Laurus nobilis oil induced by massage.Insulin-like biological activity of culinary and medicinal plant aqueous extracts in vitro.Buto SK, Tsang TK, Sielaff GW, et al. Bay leaf impaction in the esophagus and hypopharynx. .

7 Benefits of Bay Leaf during Pregnancy

Bay leaves are well-known for treating cancer, stomach issues, diabetes, pain, and much more.Early research concludes that adding a ground bay leaf to your diet twice a day alongside diabetes medicine helps in reducing blood sugar levels before meals.Patients having abnormally high cholesterol or blood fat level (dyslipidemia) benefit from bay leaf tea.The research concluded that having bay leaves tea for 10 days may help improve good cholesterol levels (HDL or high-density lipoprotein).The organic compounds of sweet bay leaf relieve an upset stomach.In fact, a cup of bay leaf tea is great for relieving flatulence, intestinal discomfort, and abdominal cramps.Bay leaves contain sedative compounds that promote relaxation and drowsiness.Bay leaf tea is an excellent natural remedy for insomnia and other sleep problems.Therefore, taking bay leaf tea an hour or two before going to bed may help you enjoy a restful sleep.Cinnamon and bay leaf tea acts as a natural treatment to relieve anxiety and stress.The ingredients leave a mildly soothing and calming effect on the nervous system.Ground bay leaf treats acne, inflammation, and other skin irritations.Mostly bay leaf is cooked as a whole for adding a little flavor to cuisines and teas, which is very safe.The leaf cannot be digested, therefore, it can possibly get stuck in the throat or pierce the intestinal lining.However, bay leaves shouldn’t be taken as an herbal supplement due to their several possible side effects.Moreover, there isn’t any scientific data on the benefits of the use of bay leaf during pregnancy, so it’s better to avoid it.Cinnamon and bay leaf tea benefit in terms of their soothing and relaxing effect.There is not enough research on the benefits of bay leaf for pregnant or breastfeeding moms.Apart from that, Bay leaf might interfere with blood sugar levels in diabetic patients.Moreover, bay leaf can also slow down your brain functions, which if combined with sleep medicines or anesthesia during surgery, can prolong recovery and the healing process.For videos related to Health and Wellness, Subscribe to our YouTube Channel:. .

BAY LEAF: Overview, Uses, Side Effects, Precautions, Interactions

Evaluation of the gastroprotective effect of Laurus nobilis seeds on ethanol induced gastric ulcer in rats.Awerbuck, D. C., Briant, T.

D., and Wax, M. K. Bay leaf: an uncommon foreign body of the hypopharynx.Cheminat, A., Stampf, J. L., and Benezra, C.

Allergic contact dermatitis to laurel (Laurus nobilis L.): isolation and identification of haptens.Dall'Acqua, S., Viola, G., Giorgetti, M., Loi, M. C., and Innocenti, G.

Two new sesquiterpene lactones from the leaves of Laurus nobilis.De Marino, S., Borbone, N., Zollo, F., Ianaro, A., Di Meglio, P., and Iorizzi, M. Megastigmane and phenolic components from Laurus nobilis L.

leaves and their inhibitory effects on nitric oxide production.Gurman, E. G., Bagirova, E. A., and Storchilo, O. V. [The effect of food and drug herbal extracts on the hydrolysis and transport of sugars in the rat small intestine under different experimental conditions].Hibasami, H., Yamada, Y., Moteki, H., Katsuzaki, H., Imai, K., Yoshioka, K., and Komiya, T. Sesquiterpenes (costunolide and zaluzanin D) isolated from laurel (Laurus nobilis L.) induce cell death and morphological change indicative of apoptotic chromatin condensation in leukemia HL-60 cells.Kaileh, M., Berghe, W.

V., Boone, E., Essawi, T., and Haegeman, G. Screening of indigenous Palestinian medicinal plants for potential anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activity.Bay leaves improve glucose and lipid profile of people with type 2 diabetes.Komiya, T., Yamada, Y., Moteki, H., Katsuzaki, H., Imai, K., and Hibasami, H.

Hot water soluble sesquiterpenes [anhydroperoxy-costunolide and 3-oxoeudesma-1,4(15),11(13)triene-12,6alpha-olide] isolated from laurel (Laurus nobilis L.) induce cell death and morphological change indicative of apoptotic chromatin condensation in leukemia cells.Lingenfelser, T., Adams, G., Solomons, D., and Marks, I. N. Bay leaf perforation of the small bowel in a patient with chronic calcific pancreatitis.Loizzo, M. R., Saab, A. M., Tundis, R., Statti, G. A., Menichini, F., Lampronti, I., Gambari, R., Cinatl, J., and Doerr, H.

W. Phytochemical analysis and in vitro antiviral activities of the essential oils of seven Lebanon species.Sayyah, M., Valizadeh, J., and Kamalinejad, M. Anticonvulsant activity of the leaf essential oil of Laurus nobilis against pentylenetetrazole- and maximal electroshock-induced seizures.Simic, A., Sokovic, M. D., Ristic, M., Grujic-Jovanovic, S., Vukojevic, J., and Marin, P.

D. The chemical composition of some Lauraceae essential oils and their antifungal activities.Skok, P.

Dried bay leaf: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage.Tepkeeva, I. I., Moiseeva, E.

V., Chaadaeva, A. V., Zhavoronkova, E. V., Kessler, Y. V., Semushina, S.

G., and Demushkin, V. P.

Evaluation of antitumor activity of peptide extracts from medicinal plants on the model of transplanted breast cancer in CBRB-Rb(8.17)1Iem mice.Tsang, T. K., Flais, M. J., and Hsin, G. Duodenal obstruction secondary to bay leaf impaction.Adisen E, Onder M. Allergic contact dermatitis from Laurus nobilis oil induced by massage.Insulin-like biological activity of culinary and medicinal plant aqueous extracts in vitro.Buto SK, Tsang TK, Sielaff GW, et al. Bay leaf impaction in the esophagus and hypopharynx.Evaluation of daily Laurus nobilis tea consumption on lipid profile biomarkers in healthy volunteers.Medeiros-Fonseca B, Mestre VF, Colaço B, et al.

Laurus nobilis (laurel) aqueous leaf extract's toxicological and anti-tumor activities in HPV16-transgenic mice. .

Herbs and Pregnancy

However, many medical professionals do not recommend herbal remedies for pregnant women since safety has not been established through extensive research.Unlike prescription drugs, natural herbs and vitamin supplements do not go through the same scrutiny and evaluation process by the FDA.The FDA urges pregnant women not to take any herbal products without talking to their health-care provider first.Herbs may contain substances that can cause miscarriage, premature birth, uterine contractions, or injury to the fetus.Few studies have been done to measure the effects of various herbs on pregnant women or fetuses.Often these organizations will list herbs with their safety ratings for the general population and for those who are pregnant or breastfeeding.These ratings can often be confusing and hard to interpret; this is why speaking with a professional who is familiar with using herbs during pregnancy is recommended.For example, the rating for rosemary is considered Likely Safe when used orally in amounts typically found in foods.But in pregnancy, rosemary is considered Possibly Unsafe when used orally in medicinal amounts.However, if you were to use rosemary in a large dose, like that used in medicinal amounts, it could be dangerous for your pregnancy.All of these herbs could be contraindicated in pregnancy when used in large or concentrated doses, but are considered safe when used in amounts found in food.Because each pregnancy is different, the best way to use herbs is under the care of a midwife, physician, herbalist, naturopathic or homeopathic doctor.Red Raspberry Leaf – Rich in iron, this herb has helped tone the uterus, increase milk production, decrease nausea, and ease labor pains.Some studies have even reported that using red raspberry leaf during pregnancy can reduce complications and the use of interventions during birth.– Rich in iron, this herb has helped tone the uterus, increase milk production, decrease nausea, and ease labor pains.Some studies have even reported that using red raspberry leaf during pregnancy can reduce complications and the use of interventions during birth.– Helps relieve nausea and vomiting Slippery Elm Bark – (when the inner bark is used orally in amounts used in foods) Used to help relieve nausea, heartburn, and vaginal irritations.– (when the inner bark is used orally in amounts used in foods) Used to help relieve nausea, heartburn, and vaginal irritations Oats & Oat Straw – Rich in calcium and magnesium; helps relieve anxiety, restlessness, and irritated skin.– when used orally in amounts commonly found in foods Capsicum (Cayenne, hot pepper) – when used topically and appropriately.The following herbs have been rated as having Insufficient Reliable Information Available by the Natural Medicines Database, even though many are recommended by homeopathic physicians, herbalists, and midwives who treat pregnant women.More extensive research and discussions with your treating health care provider will help you make the decision about what herbs are safe for you to use.Rich in Vitamin A, calcium, and iron; dandelion root and leaf can also help relieve mild edema and nourish the liver Chamomile (German) – High in calcium and magnesium; also helps with sleeplessness and inflammation of joints. .

Bay Leaf: Health Benefits, Nutrition, and Uses

Varieties of the bay leaf can be grown everywhere from the Caribbean to India, and it is found the spice aisles of grocery stores around the world.While adding minimal calories, bay leaf increases the amount of fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants to a dish. .

Can You Eat Bay Leaves?

Bay leaves are a common herb that many cooks use when making soups and stews or braising meats.The leaves can be bitter if you bite into one, but when you add them to a slow-cooking recipe, such as a soup or stew, they impart a rich, herbal, woodsy flavor and aroma to your dish.Shiny and dark green when fresh, bay leaves turn more of an olive color when dried ( 1 , 3 ).summary Bay leaves are a Mediterranean herb used to prepare soups, stews, or other slow-simmered foods.They don’t have a particularly good taste if you eat them plain, but if you use them during cooking, they can add a nice herbal flavor to your dish.Main reason to remove them Interestingly, lab studies on the essential oils in bay leaves have found that they may be toxic to some harmful pathogens, including certain strains of bacteria and fungus ( 3 , 5).That’s the main reason most recipes suggest using them whole and removing the bay leaves before serving the dish.Bay leaves are also a classic ingredient in a seasoning blend called “bouquet garni,”which is French for “garnished bouquet.” It’s a bundle of herbs that’s tied together with a string and added to a stock or sauce to boost the flavor.summary Adding fresh or dried bay leaves to your cooking liquid can enhance the flavor of your dish. .

food/cooking question. please answer if you can.

( food network nut I am I am lol ) Helpful - 0.beanlee Yeah I've never even cooked with them but good question.I feel fine... Wasn't having a great day to begin with and then this so just freaked out a bit.One article said cooking with is fine so Im thinking they were talking about eating the leaf or taking as a supplement or something.I understand the raw eggs and heating up lunch meat. .

Bay Leaf Burning: Benefits, Risks, and How-To

Share on Pinterest Many culinary enthusiasts swear by bay leaves as a key ingredient in stews and other savory dishes.People around the world have also used bay leaves in traditional and complementary medicine practices for thousands of years.And then there’s bay leaf burning, which is said to produce smoke that offers a range of health benefits.This is probably due to the fact that bay leaf smoke contains linalool, a compound found in a number of other plants, including mint and lavender.According to the theory behind aromatherapy, inhaling certain fragrances prompts olfactory (smell) receptors in your nose to communicate with the areas of your brain that help regulate your emotions.The evidence Research suggests that linalool, in the form of lavender essential oils and extracts, seems to have a calming effect.A 2010 study exploring the effects of inhaled linalool vapor in mice suggests it could help promote relaxation and reduce anxiety.Another study from 2016 involved giving rats a daily oral dose of bay leaf extract for 1 week.A few things to keep in mind None of the studies mentioned above used burned bay leaves as part of their research.Since extracts found in essential oils are typically highly concentrated, they may have greater potency than other forms of the same compound.As research from 2009 points out, linalool in the form of lavender capsules can help relieve mild anxiety but may not have the same benefits for high-anxiety situations.That said, limited evidence from animal studies does suggest bay leaves in general could help with a range of health issues, including: wounds.It’s not for everyone Bay leaves are considered safe for most people, but you’ll want to use caution if any of the following scenarios applies to you: You have diabetes.If you’re interested in using bay leaves medicinally but have respiratory issues, consider using other methods, like essential oils.If you’re interested in using bay leaves medicinally but have respiratory issues, consider using other methods, like essential oils.Again, since there isn’t any research about burning bay leaves, it’s best to check in with your healthcare provider first, just to be safe.How to try it First things first, you’re going to be burning dry plant matter in your home, so basic fire safety is a must.If it’s a windy day, the breeze might send bits of burning leaf or ash through your home.If it’s a windy day, the breeze might send bits of burning leaf or ash through your home. .

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