Aside from its many culinary uses, fennel and its seeds offer a wide array of health benefits and may provide antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial effects.Vitamin C also acts as a potent antioxidant in your body, protecting against cellular damage caused by unstable molecules called free radicals ( 3 ).Both the bulb and seeds contain the mineral manganese, which is important for enzyme activation, metabolism, cellular protection, bone development, blood sugar regulation, and wound healing ( 4 ).Finally, the plant compound limonene helps combat free radicals and has been shown to protect rat cells from damage caused by certain chronic diseases ( 9 , 10 ).Summary All parts of the fennel plant are rich in powerful antioxidants like chlorogenic acid, limonene, and quercetin — all of which may benefit health.That said, another study in 47 women found that those who supplemented with 300 mg of fennel extract daily for 12 weeks gained a small amount of weight, compared to a placebo group.For example, including rich sources of potassium in your diet may help reduce high blood pressure, a risk factor for heart disease ( 15 ).May have cancer-fighting properties The wide array of powerful plant compounds in fennel may help protect against chronic diseases, including certain cancers.Negative side effects, such as poor weight gain and difficulty feeding, have also been reported in infants whose mothers drank lactation teas containing fennel ( 21 , 22 , 23 ).Studies show that fennel extract inhibits the growth of potentially harmful bacteria and yeasts, such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans ( 24 ).A review of 10 studies noted that fennel may improve sexual function and satisfaction in menopausal women, as well as relieve hot flashes, vaginal itching, dryness, pain during sex, and sleep disturbances ( 27 ).It’s important to note that many of these studies used concentrated doses of the plant, and it’s unlikely that eating small amounts of fennel or its seeds would offer the same benefits.A study that evaluated the teratogenicity of fennel essential oil showed that high doses may have toxic effects on fetal cells ( 28 ).Although eating fennel and its seeds is likely safe, pregnant women should avoid taking supplements or ingesting the essential oil of this plant.Summary Although eating fennel and its seeds is likely safe, consuming higher doses in supplement form may react with certain medications and is unsafe for pregnant women. .

Fennel: health benefits, recipes, forms, nutrition and more

A 2020 systematic review found that digesting these seeds may also stimulate prolactin to help mothers naturally produce breast milk.Fennel tea may aid digestion and other gastrointestinal issues such as heartburn, bloating, loss of appetite, and colic in infants.The vitamin and mineral content in fennel contributes to building and maintaining bone structure and strength in the following ways:.Insufficient potassium intake can increase a person’s risk of developing high blood pressure.When excessive amounts of homocysteine build up, it can damage blood vessels and lead to heart problems.Fiber intake from fruits and vegetables like fennel is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer.The selenium found in fennel appears to stimulate the production of killer T-cells and modulates the immune system in other ways.Studies have shown dietary intake of selenium can improve immune response, especially to viral agents.Fennel is a source of vitamin B-6, which plays a vital role in energy metabolism by breaking down carbohydrates and proteins into glucose and amino acids.The fiber content in fennel helps to prevent constipation and promotes regularity for a healthy digestive tract.Dietary fiber is an important factor in weight management and works as a “bulking agent” in the digestive system.These compounds increase satiety and reduce appetite, making an individual feel fuller for longer and lowering overall calorie intake.A 2020 study found that consumption of fennel seed powder reduced menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women over 8 weeks . .

The health benefits of fennel

This review focuses on the benefits of consuming the whole vegetable, though it should be noted that fennel seed has attracted a lot of attention as a therapeutic agent for a wide range of conditions.Varieties such as the Florence or Finocchio are treated as a vegetable, but you can also buy fennel as a herb with foliage resembling dill.A member of the Apiaceae (carrot) family, it’s grown for its edible shoots, leaves and seeds, and has a strong aniseed flavour, making it an attractive and versatile ingredient.A good source of fibre as well as heart-friendly nutrients like potassium and folate, vegetables like fennel may support heart health.This is because studies report that a plentiful intake of vegetables in the diet appears to lower blood pressure and may help manage cholesterol.Both these nutrients play an important role in maintaining the health of the skin, as well as the mucous membranes that protect organs like the respiratory tract.A high intake of a wide variety of foods that are rich in these protective polyphenols is linked to a lower risk of a number of chronic diseases.Low in calories but full of flavour, fennel is a useful ingredient to include in a weight management plan.With a low glycaemic index (GI) and high fibre contribution, fennel may help moderate blood sugar release as part of a meal.She is an accredited member of the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) and the Complementary & Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC).All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other healthcare professional. .

Fennel tea: 5 health benefits and risks

In the Middle Ages, on Midsummer’s night, people hung fennel over doorways to protect the household from evil spirits.Although it is no longer used as a protective decoration, fennel is still one of the more widely used medicinal plants, being suggested for everything from colic to conjunctivitis.Fennel is used in many different cuisines, from Indian to Italian, to contemporary fusion, and all parts of the plant are used, including the leaves, seeds, and bulb.The ancient Greeks and Romans thought fennel could bring strength and fortitude and lead to longer life.detoxify the body Share on Pinterest Fennel tea may aid healthy digestion, and treat bloating, gas, or cramps, and may also act as a diuretic.It can help the smooth muscles of the gastrointestinal system relax and reduce gas, bloating, and stomach cramps.In fact, tinctures or teas made from fennel seeds can be used to treat stomach muscle spasms caused by irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, and other conditions affecting the gastrointestinal system.However, roughly 10-20 percent of women who suffer from severe cramping and discomfort during their period do not find relief through this approach.Researchers speculate that fennel helps keep the uterus from contracting, which is what prompts the pain reported by women with dysmenorrhea.The same study from Bangladesh found that fennel extract reduced indications of pain at a level close to that provided by aspirin.Research Share on Pinterest The essential oils derived from fennel seeds have a range of potential beneficial properties.controlling dust mites Researchers found that ground fennel seeds in solution were effective against bacteria that cause indigestion, diarrhea, and dysentery, as well as some hospital-acquired infections.This suggested fennel extracts could be used to help individuals ward off the effects of many chronic diseases and dangerous health conditions, including cancer, hardening of the arteries or atherosclerosis, and inflammation. .

15 Impressive Benefits of Fennel

Fennel, which has the scientific name Foeniculum vulgare miller, or its essence, is widely used around the world in mouth fresheners, toothpaste, desserts, antacids, and in various culinary applications.Apart from the uses of fennel already mentioned, there are numerous medicinal uses and health benefits, mainly due to the components of its essential oils, which are summarized below.According to the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, fennel bulb is a source of energy, vitamin C, dietary fiber, potassium and other essential minerals like calcium, phosphorus, and sodium.Vitamin C improves general immune system health, produces and repairs skin tissues, helps form collagen, and protects the blood vessel walls as an antioxidant against the harmful effects of free radicals that can frequently lead to heart diseases.Some of the components in the fennel essential oil are probably the stimulants as they encourage secretion of digestive and gastric juices, reduce inflammation in the stomach and intestines, and facilitate proper absorption of nutrients from the food.Fennel is also commonly found in medicines that treat abdominal pain, diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and other intestinal issues.This means that it can stimulate the elimination of damaging LDL or bad cholesterol, which is a major factor in heart diseases, atherosclerosis, and strokes.It shows that, in animal subjects, the extract can not only inhibit the growth of tumors, thanks to its concentrations of flavonoids, alkaloids, and phenols, but it even has the potential to be chemoprotective against the harmful effects of radiation during cancer treatment.Fennel is a very rich source of potassium, which can be an essential nutrient in our bodies and is vital for a number of important processes as per a report published in the Journal of Hypertension.High blood pressure is connected to a wide range of health issues, including heart attack, stroke, and atherosclerosis.Also, for diabetics, blood pressure issues can make the management of their insulin and glucose levels very difficult and can be the cause of many potentially lethal complications.Potassium, found in high levels in fennel bulbs and seeds, is an electrolyte, which means that it can facilitate increased electrical conduction throughout the body.Also, fennel is a vasodilator, which means more oxygen reaches the brain and neural activity can work at optimal functionality.Fennel is helpful in curing diarrhea caused by bacterial infections, as it may have some components such as anethol and cineole which may have disinfectant and antibacterial properties.Fennel being rich in many nutrients including vitamin C helps boost the immune system and protects the body against infections and damage caused by free radicals.Furthermore, fennel is used in a number of consumer products to reduce the effects of PMS, and it is also used traditionally as a soothing pain reliever and relaxing agent for menopausal women.This is due to the abundance of antioxidants (vitamin C and amino acids like arginine are very beneficial for rejuvenation of tissues and the prevention of aging), detoxifiers, and stimulants.By protecting against this destruction of the pigment cells, fennel can safely be classified as effective in eye health for numerous reasons.Fennel is useful in respiratory disorders such as congestion, bronchitis, and cough due to the presence of cineole and anethole, which are expectorant in nature, among their many other virtues.Fennel seeds and powder can help break up phlegm and prompt loosening of the toxins and buildup of the throat and nasal passages for elimination from the body to ensure quick recovery from respiratory conditions.Certain components of the fennel essential oil such as anethol, and a few other chemicals present in the plant itself can be dangerous if ingested in too large a quantity. .

Fennel Fronds Are Delicious! Stop Throwing Them Out!

Fronds are those cute frilly green leafy things attached to the stalks that grow out of a fennel bulb.The fronds boast that same anise-forward flavor, but taste more...green, if that makes any sense, with a more delicate texture.You can mix chopped fennel fronds into pestos, salsas, stocks, curries, and vinaigrettes for an added hit of freshness.You can use them to top yogurt dips, eggs, stir-fries, toasts, and seared meats.And they're delicious when tossed into green salads or strewn on top of roasted vegetables.There are a ton of ways to take advantage of the delicate flavor that fennel fronds have to offer. .

The health benefits of fennel leaves

Or why not try making some pesto with them.The leaves are full of these phytochemicals:MyricetinMyricetin has been shown to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.Research has shown that these same chemicals can prove equally beneficial to the human body, helping in areas like cancer, heart disease and diabetes prevention. .

How to Use Fennel Stalks and Fronds to Reduce Waste

You will be saving a great source of added flavor and can compost the spent stalks as you would other aromatics such as bay and tea and coffee grounds.In vegetable and fish stocks, fennel stalks bring great personality to the pot where they can be used as a compliment or replacement for other ingredients.Roughly chop them and add them to the simmering stock at the beginning of cooking to get all of the fennel flavor or near the end to impart just a hint to your pot.Throw a few fennel stalks in the steamer or boiling liquid for your next crab or shrimp fest to bring a seafood friendly flavor to your crustaceans.Boil fennel stalks in water for 10-15 minutes to create a perfumed poaching liquid for fish or chicken.Place the stalks under a piece of fish when grilling or roasting to impart subtle flavor during cooking.Make a compound butter that is an excellent topper for fish, grilled chicken, pasta hot out of the pot or steamed rice.Simply blend together a stick of room temperature butter with finely minced fennel fronds, a diced shallot or bit of red onion and a sprinkle of salt and pepper.This recipe uses all parts of the fennel plant — the bulb, stems and fronds — to create a delicious infusion.The alcohol in the infusion will open up flavor compounds that are not water soluble, amplifying the tomato taste. .

What Is Fennel? Nutrition, Benefits, How to Cook With It, More

(15) More research is needed on this end to determine how effective fennel can be in warding off harmful microbes, such as bacteria and fungi.Not to mention, ingesting essential oils is a controversial practice that most healthcare providers wouldn’t recommend.Some alternative practitioners suggest that fennel may be used instead as a complement to a healthy lifestyle, along with taking supportive herbs such as green coffee bean.(11) It’s important to talk to your doctor about any herbs or essential oils you plan on using, as these may cause adverse reactions in some people and in those on certain medications. .

Fennel: Health Benefits, Nutrients per Serving, Preparation

Although commonly used in curries and Italian cooking, fennel’s popularity is growing as an ingredient in Western cuisine.One study also showed that fennel oils could help relieve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. .

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