If you are like us, you enjoy growing, harvesting and eating home grown fruits, vegetables, and herbs.Today, I’m sharing what I have learned from years of reading and researching gardening, personal experience, and the like.Asparagus Rosemary, Sage Beets Bush Beans, Onion, Lettuces,.Lettuce, Peas, Radish, Eggplant Rosemary- Cabbage Flies Geraniums-Cabbage Worms Celery-repels White Cabbage Butterflies Dill-Cabbage Looper Carrots All beans, Lettuce, Onion, Peas, Tomatoes, Sage Dill, Parsnip Celery Tomatoes, Leeks, Bush Beans, Cabbage Potatoes, Corn Chard All Beans, Cabbage, Onions Corn, Cucumbers, Melons Cucumbers All Beans, Corn, Lettuce, Onion, Peas, Radish, Dill Potatoes Nasturtium-Cucumber Beetle Eggplant All Beans Garlic Tomatoes, Beets, Carrots Beans, Peas Lettuce All Beans, Carrots, Cucumbers, Strawberries, Onions, Cabbage Celery, Parsley, Potatoes Onions Beets, Cabbage, Carrot, Celery, Cucumber, Lettuce, Pepper, Squash,.Strawberry, Tomatoes, Cauliflower, Broccoli All Beans and Peas Potatoes Bush Beans, Cabbage, Carrot, Peas, Onion Cucumber, Squash, Turnip, Fennel, Tomato Bush Beans-Colorado Potato Beetle Pole Beans Cucumbers, Eggplant, lettuces Beets, onions, garlic Tomatoes Carrots, lettuces, Asparagus Corn, Fennel, Potatoes,Broccoli, Cabbage Dill-Tomato Horn Worm Basil-Tomato Horn Worm Rosemary Cabbage, Beans, Carrots Basil Strawberries Onions, Lettuces, bush beans Cabbages Squash Corn, Onion, Marigold, Melons, Potatoes Lemon Balm-Squash Bug Zucchini Beans, Corn, Onion Cucumbers, Potatoes. .

How to Avoid Herb Garden Design Mistakes

Wormwood may no longer be used as a natural wormer, but it still holds a place as an ornamental bedding plant. .

Companion Planting

These factors include sun exposure, weather, ecology, pollinators, insect population, soil structure and chemistry, and water supply.West Coast Seeds has conducted significant research into these companion planting guidelines and has defined the best possible results and reasons for each of our recommendations.Minimizing Risk: Companion planting increases odds of higher yields even if one crop fails or is affected by natural hardships like weather, pests, or disease.Trap Cropping: Companion planting is the ultimate organic pest management system.Ammi - This beautiful flower attracts lacewings, ladybird beetles, and parasitic wasps.Basil helps repel aphids, asparagus beetles, mites, flies, mosquitoes, and tomato horn worm.Plant with Brassicas, carrots, celery, chard, corn, cucumber, eggplant, peas, potatoes, radish, and strawberries.Plant with bush beans, Brassicas, corn, garlic, kohlrabi, leeks, lettuce, and mint.Brassicas (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale, kohlrabi, turnip) – All benefit from chamomile, dill, mint, rosemary, and sage.Buckwheat – Fixes calcium in the soil, and makes an exceptionally good green manure plant.Calendula – Repels a number of unwanted soil nematodes and asparagus beetles, but may attract slugs.Calendula attracts a wide range of pollinators because it provides nectar over the whole growing season.Celery – Good partner for beans, Brassicas, cucumber, garlic, leek, lettuce, onion, and tomatoes.Amaranth makes a great mulch between rows by competing with weeds and conserving ground moisture.Cosmos can be direct sown from early March to the end of June in our region so that it blooms continuously throughout the summer.Cucumber – Plant beside asparagus, beans, Brassicas, celery, corn, dill, kohlrabi, lettuce, onion, peas, radish, and tomatoes.Dill attracts ladybird beetles, parasitoid wasps, hoverflies, bees, and garden spiders, making it one of the most useful companion planting candidates.Echinacea - These perennial coneflowers attract hoverflies and parasitoid wasps, so they're useful for pest control in companion plantings.Eggplant – A good companion for amaranth, beans, marigolds, peas, peppers, spinach, and thyme.Fennel attracts hoverflies, ladybird beetles, parasitic wasps, and tachinid flies, so it's a kind of beneficial insect magnet.Gaillardia - This flower blooms over a very long period in summer, providing a rich source of nectar for a host of pollinators.Because of its sulfur compounds, it may also help repel whiteflies, Japanese beetles, root maggots, carrot rust fly, and other pests.Garlic, made into a tea, or spray, will act as a systemic pesticide, drawing up into the cells of the plants.It’s a good companion for beets, Brassicas, celery, lettuce, potatoes, strawberries, and tomatoes.Iberis - This early flowering plant provides nectar for pollinators before many others, and it attracts hoverflies and ground beetles.Lettuce – Good companions for beets, Brassicas, carrot, celery, chervil, cucumbers, dill, garlic, onions, radish, spinach, squash, and strawberries.Melon – Great companions for corn, marigolds, nasturtiums, pumpkin, radish, squash, and sunflowers.Onions also work well alongside beets, Brassicas, carrots, dill, kohlrabi, leeks, lettuce, strawberries and tomatoes.Peas – Superb companions for beans, carrots, celery, corn, cucumber, eggplant, parsley, peppers.Phacelia — An essential element in any organic gardener's toolkit, this multi-purpose annual flower is fast to mature, and amazingly attractive to a host of pollinators and beneficial insects.Notably, it attracts bees and predatory hoverflies to improve pollination and combat pest insects.Plant Phacelia around any crop showing poor pollination, particularly squash (including zucchini and pumpkin), melons, and cucumbers.Avoid planting potatoes near asparagus, Brassicas, carrots, cucumber, kohlrabi, melons, parsnips, rutabaga, squash, sunflower, and turnips.Rosemary repels cabbage moths, Mexican bean beetles, and carrot rust flies.Spinach – A good companion for Brassicas, eggplants, leeks, lettuce, peas, radish, and strawberries, particularly.Sunflowers are attractive to a host of wild and domestic bees, and also ladybird beetles, which prey on aphids.Tithonia - Plant this so-called Mexican Torch to attract parasitoid wasps, parasitic flies, and soldier bugs to your garden.Tomatoes – Another sensitive plant when it comes to companions, tomatoes benefit from asparagus, basil, beans, borage, carrots, celery, chives, collards, cucumber, garlic, lettuce, marigold, mint, nasturtium, onion, parsley, and peppers.Yarrow – Its scent repels aphids, but attracts hoverflies, lady beetles, and wasps that prey on garden grubs.The leaves and stems of yarrow contain enzymes that break down rapidly, so it can be added to the compost raw or as a tea to accelerate the heap.Damp, acidic soil can host club root (for example), which can be a real problem for broccoli and Brussels sprouts.Please feel free to contact us for clarification at [email protected] westcoastseeds.com, and we will do our best to bring better depth to our guides so that all of our customers can benefit. .

The Best Companion Plants for Dill

The distinctive flavor of dill, Anethum graveolens, is said to resemble a combination of fennel, anise, and celery.The feathery leaves of this delicate and attractive herb are often used to season savory dishes, including fish, salads, and soups.And the plant’s seeds are also put to culinary use, taking on a starring role in dill pickles, for example.We’ll leave it up to you as to whether you want to plant dill near tomatoes and then pull it before it gets too grown up – but keep in mind that A. graveolens does not transplant well.Onions and garlic repel aphids, which can pester dill, so gardeners might consider planting these members of the Amaryllidaceae family near the herb.In turn, it repels spider mites, so crops including cucumbers that are particularly plagued by this pest would make good companions.Dill also attracts hoverflies, ladybugs, praying mantises, bees, butterflies, and parasitic wasps, so plants that are in need of those beneficials would be good companions for A.

graveolens.As far as appearance goes, the feathery leaves offer a lovely contrast to many plants, so let your imagination run wild. .

Companion Planting Herbs: Best Herbs to Plant Together

In the garden: Thought to repel whiteflies, mosquitoes, spider mites, and aphids.In the kitchen: Adds deep, rich flavor when added to the beginning of soups and stews.Believed to repel aphids, beetles, cabbageworms, slugs, and carrot flies.In the kitchen: Use dill seed for pickling and also to add aroma and taste to strong vegetable dishes like cauliflower, onions, cabbage, and turnips.In the garden: Good companion to most vegetables and aromatic herbs, like oregano, lavender, and rosemary.Grows well with: Basil, chives, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme, lavender.In the kitchen: Excellent in almost any fish, poultry, eggs, cheese (like mozzarella), or vegetable dish that isn’t sweet.Adds warmth and spice to beans, beets, eggplants, garlic, mushrooms, spinach, summer squash, and tomatoes.Deters white cabbage moth, aphids, and flea beetles.Also adds zing to peas, cucumbers, potatoes, eggplants, garlic, lettuces, carrots, beets, summer squashes, chili, legumes, tomatoes, fruits, ginger, and chocolate.Plant near peppers, eggplant, squash, beans, cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kohlrabi, and turnips, as well as strawberries.Grows well with: Basil, chives, parsley, rosemary, sage, savory, thyme.Use in soups, casseroles, sauces, stews, stuffing, eggs, chili, and pizza.Try oregano with summer squash and potatoes, eggplant, peppers, mixed greens, and onions.Grows well with: Basil, chives, dill, fennel, lavender, lemon balm, lovage, marjoram, oregano, rosemary, sage, savory, thyme.In the kitchen: Use fresh parsley in soups, stews, gravies, sauces, and salads.Grows well with: Bay, basil, chives, fennel, lavender, lemon verbena, marjoram, oregano, parsley, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme.In the kitchen: Use for poultry, lamb, venison, tomato sauces, stews, soups, and vegetables.Use in cheese dishes, stuffings, soups, pickles, with beans and peas, and in salads.In the kitchen: Great with meat, eggs, poultry, seafood and vegetables such as beans, beets, carrots, peas, summer squashes.Grows well with: Bay, basil chives, dill, fennel, lavender, lemon verbena, lovage, marjoram, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, savory.In the kitchen: Use in chicken broth or stufing marinades for meat or fish, lamb, veal, soups, egg dishes.In the kitchen: Use in cookies, cakes, fruit fillings, and breads, or with cottage cheese, shellfish, and spaghetti dishes.In the kitchen: Use in rye breads, cheese dips and rarebits, soups, applesauce, salads, coleslaw, and over pork or sauerkraut.In the kitchen: Use with soups, salads, sauces, eggs, fish, veal, lamb, and pork.In the kitchen: Use in tomato dishes, garlic bread, soups, dips, sauces, marinades, or with meats, poultry, fish, and vegetables.In the garden: Edging cabbage and cauliflower patches with lavender is one way to repel harmful insects like moths.In the kitchen: Popular in soups, stews, stuffings, and with fish, chicken, green beans, and eggs.It works well as a gorgeous decoration, or let it dry in the kitchen and snip off a sprig for cooking! .

How to Grow and Care for Fennel in Your Herb Patch

The edible yellow blossoms, seeds, feathery leaves, pollen, roots, and stems have long been prized for their robust, anise-like fragrance and flavor, and their usefulness as ingredients in cooking, magical potions, and traditional medicine.If you grow the common type, you can prevent its spread by removing flower heads before they run to seed.Remember to consult with your local agricultural extension service before adding fennel to your herb garden.F. vulgare has upright, branching growth, finely feathered green leaves, and yellow blossoms in flattened “umbels,” resembling those of other Apiaceae family members.The dulce type has even sweeter seeds that offer the best flavor when pressed to extract their aromatic essential oils.F.

vulgare varieties are cool-weather crops that perform best when planted in either early spring, or late summer to fall.It found a welcome place in the kitchen, where the stems, leaves, and fruits were used in recipes to mask poor quality food with the pleasant aroma exuded by its aromatic compounds.Throughout the Middle Ages, traditional practitioners believed it was capable of curing ailments ranging from anti-inflammatory to GI and pulmonary problems.In superstitious circles, the mere presence of the herb was thought to ward off evil spirits and render witches’ spells ineffective.By the 1700s, the familiar herb was classified as F. vulgare Mill, after English botanist and gardener Phillip Miller.However, by the 1800s, French critic, novelist, and journalist Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr decried the herb in his A Tour Round My Garden, in which he stated in his section on fennel, “At the end of three or four hundred years it was discovered that this had never cured anybody.”.In modern times, India has taken the lead worldwide in commercial fennel production, and seeds are readily available for home garden planting.If you want to grow fennel in the spring, it’s best to start seeds indoors four to six weeks before the last frost date for your region.Also, because of the temperamental taproot, it’s wise to use seed starter cells that biodegrade, and transplant them in their entirety to the garden after the danger of frost has passed.If you don’t know the composition or pH of the earth in your garden, conduct a soil test through your local agricultural extension service, and amend as needed with compost or other rich organic matter, sand for better drainage, and lime to sweeten overly acidic soil.However, avoid soggy soil, as it makes seedlings prone to a fatal fungal condition called “damping off,” which causes them to fall over and die.Let them acclimate to the outdoors by remaining in their seed starter pots for a day or two to harden off before transplanting into the garden.They are also susceptible to “tip burn,” a condition in which insufficient watering may inhibit calcium uptake and cause the edges of the layers to turn brown.Avert trouble with proper watering and harvest when the bulbs are young and about tennis ball sized, as opposed to older and larger.Ken Adams and Dan Drost of the Utah University Extension recommend using three tablespoons of a 21-0-0 (NPK) fertilizer for every 10 feet of rows planted.If you are growing Florence types you can keep the bulbs snowy white by mounding soil or mulch up around them when the vegetables first begin to swell.Adding mulch over the top of the bulb-like roots of the Florence varieties ensure that they remain white and more satisfying in culinary endeavors.If there is, you can snip the ends off the foliage to prevent bud formation, seed drop, and potentially invasive growth.If you should have a particularly warm spell, plants may “bolt” or suddenly go to seed, causing maturity to come to a grinding halt.And finally, weed the garden regularly to reduce competition for water, deter pests, and inhibit moisture buildup that can lead to disease, especially of a fungal nature.Find bronze fennel seeds from True Leaf Market in a variety of packet sizes.Florence Don’t forget to blanch the snowy bulbs with soil or mulch to keep them from browning in the sun.Orion At 24 inches tall, this hybrid is one of the more compact bulb varieties, appreciated for being less leggy than taller cultivars.When you start with quality seed, cultivate during cool weather, provide rich soil that drains well, don’t overwater, and keep the garden free of weeds, pests and disease issues should be minimal.You may find that rabbits take quite an interest in your plants, but deer and groundhogs don’t seem to care for its aroma.If you decide you just can’t share, either pick them off by hand, or try adding a few attractions to the yard like a bird feeder or an inviting birdbath, and let avian visitors help keep them in check.These are primarily fungal conditions, with the exception of downy mildew, which is caused by a water mold called an oomycete.In light of this possibility, I recommend not taking the advice of some gardeners who suggest planting fennel beside rose bushes so the swallowtail caterpillars can eat the aphids that often plague them.You can pick the tender young shoots of common varieties to enjoy as tasty microgreens, while mature leaves are exceptional when chopped finely as a fresh herb.When harvesting, try not to take more than one-third of the entire plant at once to avoid shocking it into bolting, or prematurely running to seed.Plants may be able to tolerate a light frost, but if there’s a hard freeze predicted, harvest what you can in a hurry, including digging up the roots to use as you would carrots, if you’re so inclined.I like to slice the bulbs of Florence types in sections about an inch thick, and store them covered in water in an airtight container in the fridge.You can also store whole bulbs in the fridge for three to five days, or up to a week and a half if you place a damp paper towel over them.Snip off the feathery foliage you want for use in salads and as fragrant garnishes, or toss it into savory cooked dishes as you would with dill.Pollen scraped and gathered from dry flowers saves well in a sealed jar for approximately two years.From flowers, foliage, and pollen, to bulbs, seeds, roots, and the extraction of essential oils, F. vulgare varieties offer much to the home cook.And, the aromatic essential oils released from the chemical compounds, including anethole and fenchole, do indeed possess anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties, and promote digestion, just as the ancients believed.If you’ve never liked brussels sprouts, then you haven’t tried them al dente, cooked with bacon, and flavored with the taste of fennel and fresh dill.

.

Burke NurseryHerbs and Companion Planting

Herbs, while wonderful for culinary purposes, are great companion plants in your vegetable garden.This is a great companion plant for lettuce, grapes, carrots, tomatoes and roses.It is a host plant for beneficial wasps and it repels aphids, Colorado potato beetle, and spider mites.This is a good plant near lettuce, onions, and cole crops (such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower and kohlrabi).Never plant it near tomatoes or carrots because dill will reduce their growth.It repels imported cabbageworm and spider mites.Repels aphids, cabbage looper, cabbage maggot, imported cabbageworm, Japanese beetles, peach borer, and codling moth.Used as a moth repellent, it is considered a good companion plant in general.Mint repels ants, aphids, flea beetles, white fly, squash bug, cabbage looper, imported cabbageworm, and cabbage moths.Known as the eatable flower, this plant is good for radishes, cabbage, cucurbits, and fruit trees.It is often planted as a trap crop for aphids and for flea beetles on mint and oregano.Deters the cabbage looper, Colorado potato beetle, imported cabbageworm.Branches, laid on the ground in the garden, can repel slugs and snails.Plant near marjoram, cabbage, rosemary, strawberries, tomatoes, and carrots.The flowers attract bees and other beneficial insects.It deters the white fly, tomato hornworm, cabbage looper, cabbage maggot, imported cabbageworm, corn earworm. .

H C T C H B

Leave a reply

your email address will not be published. required fields are marked *

Name *
Email *
Website