Aside from its many culinary uses, fennel and its seeds offer a wide array of health benefits and may provide antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial effects.Vitamin C also acts as a potent antioxidant in your body, protecting against cellular damage caused by unstable molecules called free radicals ( 3 ).Both the bulb and seeds contain the mineral manganese, which is important for enzyme activation, metabolism, cellular protection, bone development, blood sugar regulation, and wound healing ( 4 ).Finally, the plant compound limonene helps combat free radicals and has been shown to protect rat cells from damage caused by certain chronic diseases ( 9 , 10 ).Summary All parts of the fennel plant are rich in powerful antioxidants like chlorogenic acid, limonene, and quercetin — all of which may benefit health.That said, another study in 47 women found that those who supplemented with 300 mg of fennel extract daily for 12 weeks gained a small amount of weight, compared to a placebo group.For example, including rich sources of potassium in your diet may help reduce high blood pressure, a risk factor for heart disease ( 15 ).May have cancer-fighting properties The wide array of powerful plant compounds in fennel may help protect against chronic diseases, including certain cancers.Negative side effects, such as poor weight gain and difficulty feeding, have also been reported in infants whose mothers drank lactation teas containing fennel ( 21 , 22 , 23 ).Studies show that fennel extract inhibits the growth of potentially harmful bacteria and yeasts, such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans ( 24 ).A review of 10 studies noted that fennel may improve sexual function and satisfaction in menopausal women, as well as relieve hot flashes, vaginal itching, dryness, pain during sex, and sleep disturbances ( 27 ).It’s important to note that many of these studies used concentrated doses of the plant, and it’s unlikely that eating small amounts of fennel or its seeds would offer the same benefits.A study that evaluated the teratogenicity of fennel essential oil showed that high doses may have toxic effects on fetal cells ( 28 ).Although eating fennel and its seeds is likely safe, pregnant women should avoid taking supplements or ingesting the essential oil of this plant.Summary Although eating fennel and its seeds is likely safe, consuming higher doses in supplement form may react with certain medications and is unsafe for pregnant women. .

Fennel: health benefits, recipes, forms, nutrition and more

A 2020 systematic review found that digesting these seeds may also stimulate prolactin to help mothers naturally produce breast milk.Fennel tea may aid digestion and other gastrointestinal issues such as heartburn, bloating, loss of appetite, and colic in infants.The vitamin and mineral content in fennel contributes to building and maintaining bone structure and strength in the following ways:.Insufficient potassium intake can increase a person’s risk of developing high blood pressure.When excessive amounts of homocysteine build up, it can damage blood vessels and lead to heart problems.Fiber intake from fruits and vegetables like fennel is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer.The selenium found in fennel appears to stimulate the production of killer T-cells and modulates the immune system in other ways.Studies have shown dietary intake of selenium can improve immune response, especially to viral agents.Fennel is a source of vitamin B-6, which plays a vital role in energy metabolism by breaking down carbohydrates and proteins into glucose and amino acids.The fiber content in fennel helps to prevent constipation and promotes regularity for a healthy digestive tract.Dietary fiber is an important factor in weight management and works as a “bulking agent” in the digestive system.These compounds increase satiety and reduce appetite, making an individual feel fuller for longer and lowering overall calorie intake.A 2020 study found that consumption of fennel seed powder reduced menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women over 8 weeks . .

The health benefits of fennel

This review focuses on the benefits of consuming the whole vegetable, though it should be noted that fennel seed has attracted a lot of attention as a therapeutic agent for a wide range of conditions.Varieties such as the Florence or Finocchio are treated as a vegetable, but you can also buy fennel as a herb with foliage resembling dill.A member of the Apiaceae (carrot) family, it’s grown for its edible shoots, leaves and seeds, and has a strong aniseed flavour, making it an attractive and versatile ingredient.A good source of fibre as well as heart-friendly nutrients like potassium and folate, vegetables like fennel may support heart health.This is because studies report that a plentiful intake of vegetables in the diet appears to lower blood pressure and may help manage cholesterol.Both these nutrients play an important role in maintaining the health of the skin, as well as the mucous membranes that protect organs like the respiratory tract.A high intake of a wide variety of foods that are rich in these protective polyphenols is linked to a lower risk of a number of chronic diseases.Low in calories but full of flavour, fennel is a useful ingredient to include in a weight management plan.With a low glycaemic index (GI) and high fibre contribution, fennel may help moderate blood sugar release as part of a meal.She is an accredited member of the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) and the Complementary & Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC).All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other healthcare professional. .

What Is Fennel? Nutrition, Benefits, How to Cook With It, More

(15) More research is needed on this end to determine how effective fennel can be in warding off harmful microbes, such as bacteria and fungi.Not to mention, ingesting essential oils is a controversial practice that most healthcare providers wouldn’t recommend.Some alternative practitioners suggest that fennel may be used instead as a complement to a healthy lifestyle, along with taking supportive herbs such as green coffee bean.(11) It’s important to talk to your doctor about any herbs or essential oils you plan on using, as these may cause adverse reactions in some people and in those on certain medications. .

What Are the Health Benefits of Raw Fennel Root?

Gooseberries are tart berries commonly used in fruit desserts or served in cooked sauces for rich meat like roast duck.Vitamin C is an antioxidant that can prevent free radical compounds from damaging DNA and cellular tissue.A diet that includes plenty of vitamin C may lower your risk of hypertension, heart disease, cancer and osteoarthritis.The body needs manganese to promote calcium absorption, to aid with energy metabolism and blood sugar regulation and to trigger the function of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, or SOD. .

Fennel Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits

Typically associated with Italian or Indian cooking, fennel belongs to the same family as carrots and dill.Whether eaten raw in salads or cooked as part of a recipe, fennel is a nutritious vegetable worthy of more attention.Fennel also offers essential minerals like manganese, chromium, copper, iron, and zinc..Beyond vitamins and minerals, fennel contains a number of phytonutrients and flavonoids known to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties.Anethole is a free radical scavenger that has been shown to destroy damaged cells before they become cancerous.Chewing on fennel seeds alters the pH balance of the mouth, decreasing the likelihood of dental cavities.Studies show that chewing on fennel seeds for just 10 minutes increases saliva production and produces slight raises in the mouth's pH value. These changes decrease bacterial activity and protect from tooth decay.Not only is fennel naturally free of saturated and trans fats, but its fiber content and antioxidants are also great defenders against cardiovascular disease.Vitamin C has been shown to promote nitric oxide production, which relaxes and opens up the blood vessels through vasodilation.The neurotransmitter, dopamine, often blocks the hormone responsible for milk production, prolactin.Fennel is often used to treat digestive disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), colic, and heartburn.Skin rashes, itchy mouth, or coughing due to inhalation can be mistaken for allergies, but these symptoms are usually signs of intolerance or irritation.Wild fennel, on the other hand, has numerous feathery fronds and a smaller, flatter bulb.Use fennel in recipes to add a savory sweetness to foods, both cooked and raw.Fennel's mildly sweet anise-flavor can be toned down by slicing the bulb very thinly and soaking in ice water for a few minutes.Although the white bulb of fennel is most commonly eaten, the stalks, seeds, and fronds are also edible. .

The Best and Worst Foods for Bloating

Most of us pass gas anywhere from 12 to 25 times a day, according to Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and surveys show that abdominal bloating affects up to 30% of Americans.“Having a perfectly flat stomach all the time isn’t normal,” says Health contributing nutrition editor Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD.“After you eat and drink, food and liquids take up space inside your stomach and intestines, and that means some expansion.”.Kale, broccoli, and cabbage are cruciferous vegetables, which contain raffinose — a sugar that remains undigested until bacteria in your gut ferment it, which produces gas and, in turn, makes you bloat.“Consistently eating nutrient-rich, high-fiber foods leads to having a stronger, healthier digestive system that’s less prone to bloating,” Sass says.These little guys are basically bursts of protein in a pod, but they also contain sugars and fibers that our bodies can’t absorb.The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) also suggests the use of lactase tablets like Lactaid, which help people digest foods that contain lactose.High in fiber, apples also contain fructose and sorbitol, sugars found in fruits that many people can’t tolerate, Sass says.Apples are a great snack, however: One fruit provides an average of 4.5 grams of protein and around 10% of your daily vitamin C requirement, so don’t give up on them altogether.“Eating apples specifically has been linked to a lower risk of heart disease and respiratory problems, including asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema,” Sass says.Foods rich in potassium—like bananas, plus avocados, kiwis, oranges, and pistachios—prevent water retention by regulating sodium levels in your body and can thus reduce salt-induced bloating.The enzyme contained in papaya (papain) helps break down proteins in your GI system, which makes digestion easier.Finally, the vegetable contains soluble and insoluble fibers, which helps promote overall digestive health.The seeds have a compound that relaxes GI spasms, which allows gas to pass and relieve bloating, says Sass.Fresh ginger can be added to smoothies and salad dressings, and it adds tons of flavor to recipes like these.Both kinds relax GI muscles to help dissipate the gas that causes your stomach to bloat.Aside from improving digestion, chamomile can also soothe and relax, which can help ease any sort of stomach discomfort. .

5 Overlooked Health Benefits Of Fennel

Fennel with its bulb-like shape and licorice-like flavor has a rich history that dates back to ancient times.The dietary fiber in fennel helps fill you up, so it's ideal for appetite and weight control.A fennel bulb contains more than 960 milligrams of potassium, about 25 per cent of the recommended daily intake for adults.A fennel bulb contains 115 milligrams of calcium, just under 10 per cent of the recommended daily intake for older adults.Calcium-rich foods, such as chia seeds, bok choi and kale, are essential for bone health and osteoporosis prevention.Like other root vegetables, fennel is a great addition to soups, stews, chowders as well as salads and side dishes.Fennel leaves, which look a lot like a dill sprig, can be used as a garnish or the same way you'd use any fresh herb.Thinly sliced raw fennel adds crunch to a salad and marries well with apple, celery and citrus flavors.Sautéed, stewed, braised or grilled, fennel is translucent and soft, very similar to onion.She's the co-author of the best-selling cookbook Nourish: Whole Food Recipes featuring Seeds, Nuts and Beans (Whitecap, 2016) and writes a health column for the the Washington Post. .

Fennel Seeds

People from diverse cultures prefer consuming fennel seeds owing to its various medicinal properties.For instance, Indian families often consume fennel seeds after having their meal for healthier and faster digestion.Fennel seeds are often interlinked to ‘longevity’ and are known for offering a wide range of nutritional properties that aid in improving the well being of a human body.Moreover, fennel seeds offer a concentrated source of different minerals that are vital for the regulation of blood pressure as well as for the retention of water inside our body.One serving of fennel seeds contains 1% of the RDI (Recommended Dietary Intake) for Vitamin C, which acts as a dynamic antioxidant for your body, protecting your skin from any damages caused by the sun, smoke, or pollution.Fennel seeds contain powerful antioxidants and phytonutrients that makes them a highly nutritious source with many health benefits, which are as follows:.The Journal of Food Science published a study which showed that chewing fennel seeds helps in increasing the level of nitrite in saliva.In addition to this, fennel seeds are also rich in potassium which helps in controlling the blood pressure and heart rate.Fennel seeds also offer various ayurvedic properties that help in treating other skin ailments like rashes and dryness.The polyphenol antioxidants in fennel seeds also have anti-inflammatory properties that help in fighting various bacteria and viruses, keeping you safe from various diseases.Consuming one cup of fennel tea, releases essential oils which helps in suppressing hunger.Fennel tea is suggested by many dietitians before meals to suppress the calorie intake for weight loss.Fennel seeds can act as a vital source for curing constipation, bloating, and indigestion as they contain essential oils like anethole, fenchone, and estragole that contributes to the anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic properties.These elements help significantly in breaking down the food in the body, and keeps your digestive system functioning smoothly.Due to the presence of antioxidants, fennel seeds help in neutralizing free radicals that are responsible for developing cancer.Fennel seeds are often considered as an essential food item to include in diets for losing weight.This means that after consuming one serving of fennel seeds, you won’t get hungry anytime soon, which can avoid overeating.Additionally, with the presence of antioxidants, fennel seeds help in improving the body’s absorption power for vitamins and minerals.Grind fennel seeds and cardamom into a fine powder in a food processor or mixer grinder. .

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