In the Middle Ages, on Midsummer’s night, people hung fennel over doorways to protect the household from evil spirits.Although it is no longer used as a protective decoration, fennel is still one of the more widely used medicinal plants, being suggested for everything from colic to conjunctivitis.Fennel is used in many different cuisines, from Indian to Italian, to contemporary fusion, and all parts of the plant are used, including the leaves, seeds, and bulb.The ancient Greeks and Romans thought fennel could bring strength and fortitude and lead to longer life.detoxify the body Share on Pinterest Fennel tea may aid healthy digestion, and treat bloating, gas, or cramps, and may also act as a diuretic.It can help the smooth muscles of the gastrointestinal system relax and reduce gas, bloating, and stomach cramps.In fact, tinctures or teas made from fennel seeds can be used to treat stomach muscle spasms caused by irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, and other conditions affecting the gastrointestinal system.However, roughly 10-20 percent of women who suffer from severe cramping and discomfort during their period do not find relief through this approach.Researchers speculate that fennel helps keep the uterus from contracting, which is what prompts the pain reported by women with dysmenorrhea.The same study from Bangladesh found that fennel extract reduced indications of pain at a level close to that provided by aspirin.Research Share on Pinterest The essential oils derived from fennel seeds have a range of potential beneficial properties.controlling dust mites Researchers found that ground fennel seeds in solution were effective against bacteria that cause indigestion, diarrhea, and dysentery, as well as some hospital-acquired infections.This suggested fennel extracts could be used to help individuals ward off the effects of many chronic diseases and dangerous health conditions, including cancer, hardening of the arteries or atherosclerosis, and inflammation. .

Fennel seeds (Saunf) for type 2 diabetes: Does it really help lower

Fennel and its seeds offer a wide array of benefits, helping you tackle many ailments- from digestive problems like stomach bloating to conjunctivitis.It is claimed that both the bulb and the seeds of the fennel plant are loaded with antioxidants and many other compounds that can help manage various conditions, including lowering blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes.Also, a study in Bangladesh found that mice that were treated with an extract made from mentholated fennel seeds experienced a reduction in their blood sugar levels at some dosage - at a rate comparable to that of standard antihyperglycemic medications.Fennel and its seeds are also chock full of fibre, a nutrient shown to reduce high cholesterol and certain heart disease risk factors.While fennel is possibly safe when taken in appropriate doses for a short period of time, people who are sensitive to certain plants like carrot, celery or mugwort may develop allergic reactions to it, as per WebMD.Disclaimer: Tips and suggestions mentioned in the article are for general information purpose only and should not be construed as professional medical advice. .

From aiding digestion to controlling blood sugar: Here are the health

They are also loaded with the mineral manganese, which is important for enzyme activation, metabolism, cellular protection, bone development, blood sugar regulation, and wound healing.The seeds help neutralise the acidity of the stomach which can sometimes increase due to improper dietary habits, unregulated lifestyle and weight.The main component of haemoglobin is iron and fennel is a good source of it and an amino acid called histidine.Since high levels of cholesterol can be harmful to the body as it causes various health problems such as heart attacks, strokes and artherosclerosis, fennel seeds is a good option as the fibre present in it helps keep cholesterol levels low in the blood.To reduce high blood pressure, fennel seeds which are an essential source of potassium can help.A study published in World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, in which mice were treated with an extract made from mentholated fennel seeds, found that, at some dosage levels, this extract reduced blood glucose levels at a rate comparable to that of standard antihyperglycemic medications.It is also claimed that beta-carotene, another antioxidant in fennel seeds, may help lower cholesterol levels in patients with type 2 diabetes.While fennel is safe when taken in appropriate doses for a short period of time, people who are sensitive to certain plants like carrot, celery or mugwort may develop allergic reactions to it, as per WebMD. .

Fennel & Diabetes

A vegetable native to the Mediterranean and parts of Asia, fresh fennel has stems, leaves and base that can be used raw or cooked in salads, soups and stir-fries.A later study included in the June 2011 issue of the "Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences" determined that fennel essential oil could lower the blood sugar levels of diabetes-induced rats 2.A high intake of vitamin C may lower the blood sugar and circulating lipid levels of people with Type 2 diabetes, reported an "Indian Journal of Medical Research" study in 2007 5.At each meal, diabetics should aim to fill at least half of their plates with cooked or raw nonstarchy vegetables like fennel, says the ADA.To help keep your sodium intake under control, use dried fennel seeds -- both ground and whole -- along with other herbs and spices instead of salt or high-sodium seasoning mixes to flavor your food. .

Effect of fennel supplementation along with high-protein, low

The aim of this study was investigated the effects of fennel supplementation with energy-restricted diets on body fat and muscle percentage and insulin resistance in women with PCOS. .

Fennel Tea: Benefits, Health Information, and Side Effects

Fennel has long been thought to strengthen your eyesight, regulate hormones, improve your digestion, and help memory.If you feel a cold coming on, drinking some fennel tea can help your body fight back against the pathogens attacking your immune system.It can help you sleep A serving of hot tea is a great way to unwind after a long day, and putting fennel in the brew gives you an extra health boost.It can aid breast milk production Fennel has been used for centuries as a galactagogue — a substance to increase the quality and quantity of breastmilk in breastfeeding moms.This lessens the load on your kidney and liver, helps new cell production, and even reduces the signs of aging.It can relieve constipation Fennel tea relaxes your digestive muscles, which might be just what you need if you’re struggling with regular bowel movements.The estrogen that is activated in the oil of the fennel seed could confuse your pregnant body, which is already experiencing a surge in all kinds of hormones. .

ANISE: Overview, Uses, Side Effects, Precautions, Interactions

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O., and Rafatullah, S. Aqueous suspension of anise "Pimpinella anisum" protects rats against chemically induced gastric ulcers.Occupational protein contact dermatitis from spices in a butcher: a new presentation of the mugwort-spice syndrome.Astani, A., Reichling, J., and Schnitzler, P. Screening for Antiviral Activities of Isolated Compounds from Essential Oils.In vitro susceptibility of the Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori to extracts of Iranian medicinal plants.B. Anethole blocks both early and late cellular responses transduced by tumor necrosis factor: effect on NF-kappaB, AP-1, JNK, MAPKK and apoptosis.Fitzgerald, D.

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Structure-function analysis of the vanillin molecule and its antifungal properties.Karapinar, M. Inhibitory effects of anethole and eugenol on the growth and toxin production of Aspergillus parasiticus.Koch, C., Reichling, J., Schneele, J., and Schnitzler, P.

Inhibitory effect of essential oils against herpes simplex virus type 2.Kosalec, I., Pepeljnjak, S., and Kustrak, D. Antifungal activity of fluid extract and essential oil from anise fruits (Pimpinella anisum L., Apiaceae).The synergistic preservative effects of the essential oils of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) against acid-tolerant food microflora.Ozcan, M. Effect of spice hydrosols on the growth of Aspergillus parasiticus NRRL 2999 strain.Picon, P.

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T. Randomized clinical trial of a phytotherapic compound containing Pimpinella anisum, Foeniculum vulgare, Sambucus nigra, and Cassia augustifolia for chronic constipation.Poon, T.

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Cheilitis caused by contact allergy to anethole in spearmint flavoured toothpaste.Prajapati, V., Tripathi, A. K., Aggarwal, K. K., and Khanuja, S.

P. Insecticidal, repellent and oviposition-deterrent activity of selected essential oils against Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus.Reichling, J., Merkel, B., and Hofmeister, P.

Studies on the biological activities of rare phenylpropanoids of the genus Pimpinella.Yu, L., Guo, N., Yang, Y., Wu, X., Meng, R., Fan, J., Ge, F., Wang, X., Liu, J., and Deng, X. Microarray analysis of p-anisaldehyde-induced transcriptome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.Boskabady MH, Ramazani-Assari M. Relaxant effect of Pimpinella anisum on isolated guinea pig tracheal chains and its possible mechanism(s).Farahmand M, Khalili D, Ramezani Tehrani F, Amin G, Negarandeh R.

Could anise decrease the intensity of premenstrual syndrome symptoms in comparison to placebo?Ghoshegir SA, Mazaheri M, Ghannadi A, et al. Pimpinella anisum in modifying the quality of life in patients with functional dyspepsia: A double-blind randomized clinical trial.Ghoshegir SA, Mazaheri M, Ghannadi A, et al. Pimpinella anisum in the treatment of functional dyspepsia: A double-blind, randomized clinical trial.The effect of a herbal water-extract on histamine release from mast cells and on allergic asthma.Wound healing activity of Pimpinella anisum methanolic extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.Ishikawa T, Fujimatu E, Kitajima J. Water-soluble constituents of anise: new glucosides of anethole glycol and its related compounds.Kassi E, Papoutsi Z, Fokialakis N, et al. Greek plant extracts exhibit selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM)-like properties.Kreydiyyeh SI, Usta J, Knio K, et al. Aniseed oil increases glucose absorption and reduces urine output in the rat.Mosaffa-Jahromi M, Lankarani KB, Pasalar M, et al.

Efficacy and safety of enteric coated capsules of anise oil to treat irritable bowel syndrome.Effectiveness of anise oil for treatment of mild to moderate depression in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: A randomized active and placebo-controlled clinical trial.Mosavat SH, Jaberi AR, Sobhani Z, Mosaffa-Jahromi M, Iraji A, Moayedfard A. Efficacy of anise (Pimpinella anisum L.) oil for migraine headache: A pilot randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial.Muller M, Byres M, Jaspars M.

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The effect of an Iranian herbal drug on primary dysmenorrhea: a clinical controlled trial.Nahidi F, Kariman N, Simbar M, Mojab F. The study on the effects of Pimpinella anisum on relief and recurrence of menopausal hot flashes.The fruit essential oil of Pimpinella anisum exerts anticonvulsant effects in mice.Comparison of aniseeds and coriander seeds for antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and antioxidant activities.Rodrigues VM, Rosa PT, Marques MO, et al. Supercritical extraction of essential oil from aniseed (Pimpinella anisum L) using CO2: solubility, kinetics, and composition data.The effects of fruit essential oil of the Pimpinella anisum on acquisition and expression of morphine induced conditioned place preference in mice.The influence of essential oil of aniseed (Pimpinella anisum, L.) on drug effects on the central nervous system.Samojlik I, Petkovic S, Stilinovic N, et al.

Pharmacokinetic herb-drug interaction between essential oil of aniseed (Pimpinella anisum L., Apiaceae) and acetaminophen and caffeine: A potential risk for clinical practice.Shojaii A, Abdollahi Fard M. Review of pharmacological properties and chemical constituents of Pimpinella anisum.Tabanca N, Khan SI, Bedir E, et al.

Estrogenic activity of isolated compounds and essential oils of Pimpinella species from Turkey, evaluated using a recombinant yeast screen.Twaij HA, Elisha EE, Khalid RM, Paul NJ. .

10 Science-Based Benefits of Fennel and Fennel Seeds

Aside from its many culinary uses, fennel and its seeds offer a wide array of health benefits and may provide antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial effects.Vitamin C also acts as a potent antioxidant in your body, protecting against cellular damage caused by unstable molecules called free radicals ( 3 ).Both the bulb and seeds contain the mineral manganese, which is important for enzyme activation, metabolism, cellular protection, bone development, blood sugar regulation, and wound healing ( 4 ).Finally, the plant compound limonene helps combat free radicals and has been shown to protect rat cells from damage caused by certain chronic diseases ( 9 , 10 ).Summary All parts of the fennel plant are rich in powerful antioxidants like chlorogenic acid, limonene, and quercetin — all of which may benefit health.That said, another study in 47 women found that those who supplemented with 300 mg of fennel extract daily for 12 weeks gained a small amount of weight, compared to a placebo group.For example, including rich sources of potassium in your diet may help reduce high blood pressure, a risk factor for heart disease ( 15 ).May have cancer-fighting properties The wide array of powerful plant compounds in fennel may help protect against chronic diseases, including certain cancers.Negative side effects, such as poor weight gain and difficulty feeding, have also been reported in infants whose mothers drank lactation teas containing fennel ( 21 , 22 , 23 ).Studies show that fennel extract inhibits the growth of potentially harmful bacteria and yeasts, such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans ( 24 ).A review of 10 studies noted that fennel may improve sexual function and satisfaction in menopausal women, as well as relieve hot flashes, vaginal itching, dryness, pain during sex, and sleep disturbances ( 27 ).It’s important to note that many of these studies used concentrated doses of the plant, and it’s unlikely that eating small amounts of fennel or its seeds would offer the same benefits.A study that evaluated the teratogenicity of fennel essential oil showed that high doses may have toxic effects on fetal cells ( 28 ).Although eating fennel and its seeds is likely safe, pregnant women should avoid taking supplements or ingesting the essential oil of this plant.Summary Although eating fennel and its seeds is likely safe, consuming higher doses in supplement form may react with certain medications and is unsafe for pregnant women. .

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