Aside from its many culinary uses, fennel and its seeds offer a wide array of health benefits and may provide antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial effects.Vitamin C also acts as a potent antioxidant in your body, protecting against cellular damage caused by unstable molecules called free radicals ( 3 ).Both the bulb and seeds contain the mineral manganese, which is important for enzyme activation, metabolism, cellular protection, bone development, blood sugar regulation, and wound healing ( 4 ).Finally, the plant compound limonene helps combat free radicals and has been shown to protect rat cells from damage caused by certain chronic diseases ( 9 , 10 ).Summary All parts of the fennel plant are rich in powerful antioxidants like chlorogenic acid, limonene, and quercetin — all of which may benefit health.That said, another study in 47 women found that those who supplemented with 300 mg of fennel extract daily for 12 weeks gained a small amount of weight, compared to a placebo group.For example, including rich sources of potassium in your diet may help reduce high blood pressure, a risk factor for heart disease ( 15 ).May have cancer-fighting properties The wide array of powerful plant compounds in fennel may help protect against chronic diseases, including certain cancers.Negative side effects, such as poor weight gain and difficulty feeding, have also been reported in infants whose mothers drank lactation teas containing fennel ( 21 , 22 , 23 ).Studies show that fennel extract inhibits the growth of potentially harmful bacteria and yeasts, such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans ( 24 ).A review of 10 studies noted that fennel may improve sexual function and satisfaction in menopausal women, as well as relieve hot flashes, vaginal itching, dryness, pain during sex, and sleep disturbances ( 27 ).It’s important to note that many of these studies used concentrated doses of the plant, and it’s unlikely that eating small amounts of fennel or its seeds would offer the same benefits.A study that evaluated the teratogenicity of fennel essential oil showed that high doses may have toxic effects on fetal cells ( 28 ).Although eating fennel and its seeds is likely safe, pregnant women should avoid taking supplements or ingesting the essential oil of this plant.Summary Although eating fennel and its seeds is likely safe, consuming higher doses in supplement form may react with certain medications and is unsafe for pregnant women. .

The health benefits of fennel

This review focuses on the benefits of consuming the whole vegetable, though it should be noted that fennel seed has attracted a lot of attention as a therapeutic agent for a wide range of conditions.Varieties such as the Florence or Finocchio are treated as a vegetable, but you can also buy fennel as a herb with foliage resembling dill.A member of the Apiaceae (carrot) family, it’s grown for its edible shoots, leaves and seeds, and has a strong aniseed flavour, making it an attractive and versatile ingredient.A good source of fibre as well as heart-friendly nutrients like potassium and folate, vegetables like fennel may support heart health.This is because studies report that a plentiful intake of vegetables in the diet appears to lower blood pressure and may help manage cholesterol.Both these nutrients play an important role in maintaining the health of the skin, as well as the mucous membranes that protect organs like the respiratory tract.A high intake of a wide variety of foods that are rich in these protective polyphenols is linked to a lower risk of a number of chronic diseases.With a low glycaemic index (GI) and high fibre contribution, fennel may help moderate blood sugar release as part of a meal.Fennel is a good source of folate, which is needed for healthy red blood cell formation.She is an accredited member of the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) and the Complementary & Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC).All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other healthcare professional. .

Fennel: health benefits, recipes, forms, nutrition and more

A 2020 systematic review found that digesting these seeds may also stimulate prolactin to help mothers naturally produce breast milk.Fennel tea may aid digestion and other gastrointestinal issues such as heartburn, bloating, loss of appetite, and colic in infants.The vitamin and mineral content in fennel contributes to building and maintaining bone structure and strength in the following ways:.Insufficient potassium intake can increase a person’s risk of developing high blood pressure.When excessive amounts of homocysteine build up, it can damage blood vessels and lead to heart problems.Fiber intake from fruits and vegetables like fennel is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer.The selenium found in fennel appears to stimulate the production of killer T-cells and modulates the immune system in other ways.Studies have shown dietary intake of selenium can improve immune response, especially to viral agents.Fennel is a source of vitamin B-6, which plays a vital role in energy metabolism by breaking down carbohydrates and proteins into glucose and amino acids.The fiber content in fennel helps to prevent constipation and promotes regularity for a healthy digestive tract.Dietary fiber is an important factor in weight management and works as a “bulking agent” in the digestive system.These compounds increase satiety and reduce appetite, making an individual feel fuller for longer and lowering overall calorie intake.A 2020 study found that consumption of fennel seed powder reduced menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women over 8 weeks . .

Fennel: Health Benefits, Nutrients per Serving, Preparation

Although commonly used in curries and Italian cooking, fennel’s popularity is growing as an ingredient in Western cuisine.One study also showed that fennel oils could help relieve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. .

Fennel tea: 5 health benefits and risks

In the Middle Ages, on Midsummer’s night, people hung fennel over doorways to protect the household from evil spirits.Although it is no longer used as a protective decoration, fennel is still one of the more widely used medicinal plants, being suggested for everything from colic to conjunctivitis.Fennel is used in many different cuisines, from Indian to Italian, to contemporary fusion, and all parts of the plant are used, including the leaves, seeds, and bulb.The ancient Greeks and Romans thought fennel could bring strength and fortitude and lead to longer life.detoxify the body Share on Pinterest Fennel tea may aid healthy digestion, and treat bloating, gas, or cramps, and may also act as a diuretic.It can help the smooth muscles of the gastrointestinal system relax and reduce gas, bloating, and stomach cramps.In fact, tinctures or teas made from fennel seeds can be used to treat stomach muscle spasms caused by irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, and other conditions affecting the gastrointestinal system.However, roughly 10-20 percent of women who suffer from severe cramping and discomfort during their period do not find relief through this approach.Researchers speculate that fennel helps keep the uterus from contracting, which is what prompts the pain reported by women with dysmenorrhea.The same study from Bangladesh found that fennel extract reduced indications of pain at a level close to that provided by aspirin.Research Share on Pinterest The essential oils derived from fennel seeds have a range of potential beneficial properties.controlling dust mites Researchers found that ground fennel seeds in solution were effective against bacteria that cause indigestion, diarrhea, and dysentery, as well as some hospital-acquired infections.This suggested fennel extracts could be used to help individuals ward off the effects of many chronic diseases and dangerous health conditions, including cancer, hardening of the arteries or atherosclerosis, and inflammation. .

FENNEL: Overview, Uses, Side Effects, Precautions, Interactions

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Antiinflammatory, analgesic and antioxidant activities of the fruit of Foeniculum vulgare.dulce (sweet fennel), Anthemis nobilis (Roman chamomile) and Mentha x piperita (peppermint).Gutierrez, J., Rodriguez, G., Barry-Ryan, C., and Bourke, P. Efficacy of plant essential oils against foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria associated with ready-to-eat vegetables: antimicrobial and sensory screening.Hotta, M., Nakata, R., Katsukawa, M., Hori, K., Takahashi, S., and Inoue, H. Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, activates PPARalpha and gamma and suppresses COX-2 expression.Javidnia, K., Dastgheib, L., Mohammadi, Samani S., and Nasiri, A.

Antihirsutism activity of Fennel (fruits of Foeniculum vulgare) extract.Joshi, H. and Parle, M. Cholinergic basis of memory-strengthening effect of Foeniculum vulgare Linn.Lee, H. S. Acaricidal activity of constituents identified in Foeniculum vulgare fruit oil against Dermatophagoides spp.Modaress, Nejad, V and Asadipour, M. Comparison of the effectiveness of fennel and mefenamic acid on pain intensity in dysmenorrhoea.Murone, A.

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Severe methemoglobinemia due to food intoxication in infants.Namavar, Jahromi B., Tartifizadeh, A., and Khabnadideh, S. Comparison of fennel and mefenamic acid for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea.Comparative essential oil composition and antifungal effect of bitter fennel (Foeniculum vulgare ssp.Picon, P.

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Randomized clinical trial of a phytotherapic compound containing Pimpinella anisum, Foeniculum vulgare, Sambucus nigra, and Cassia augustifolia for chronic constipation.Platel K and Srinivasan K. A Study of the digestive stimulant action of select spices in experimental rats.Schone, F., Vetter, A., Hartung, H., Bergmann, H., Biertumpfel, A., Richter, G., Muller, S., and Breitschuh, G.

Effects of essential oils from fennel (Foeniculi aetheroleum) and caraway (Carvi aetheroleum) in pigs.Singh, B. and Kale, R.

K. Chemomodulatory action of Foeniculum vulgare (Fennel) on skin and forestomach papillomagenesis, enzymes associated with xenobiotic metabolism and antioxidant status in murine model system.Subehan, Usia, T., Iwata, H., Kadota, S., and Tezuka, Y.

Mechanism-based inhibition of CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 by Indonesian medicinal plants.Subehan, Zaidi, S. F., Kadota, S., and Tezuka, Y. Inhibition on human liver cytochrome P450 3A4 by constituents of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare): identification and characterization of a mechanism-based inactivator.Tognolini, M., Ballabeni, V., Bertoni, S., Bruni, R., Impicciatore, M., and Barocelli, E.

Protective effect of Foeniculum vulgare essential oil and anethole in an experimental model of thrombosis.Tognolini, M., Barocelli, E., Ballabeni, V., Bruni, R., Bianchi, A., Chiavarini, M., and Impicciatore, M. Comparative screening of plant essential oils: phenylpropanoid moiety as basic core for antiplatelet activity.Vasudevan, K., Vembar, S., Veeraraghavan, K., and Haranath, P. S. Influence of intragastric perfusion of aqueous spice extracts on acid secretion in anesthetized albino rats.Wright, C.

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Herbal medicines as diuretics: a review of the scientific evidence.Zahrani SH, Amjady MA, Mojab F, and et al. Clinical effects of foeniculum vulgare extract on systemic symptoms of primary dysmenorrhea in students of Shaheed Beheshti University in Tehran [Farsi].Zeller, A., Horst, K., and Rychlik, M.

Study of the metabolism of estragole in humans consuming fennel tea.Zidorn, C., Johrer, K., Ganzera, M., Schubert, B., Sigmund, E. M., Mader, J., Greil, R., Ellmerer, E.

P., and Stuppner, H. Polyacetylenes from the Apiaceae vegetables carrot, celery, fennel, parsley, and parsnip and their cytotoxic activities.Abedi P, Najafian M, Yaralizadeh M, Namjoyan F. Effect of fennel vaginal cream on sexual function in postmenopausal women: A double blind randomized controlled trial.Foeniculum vulgare Mill: a review of its botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology, contemporary application, and toxicology.Bae J, Kim J, Choue R, Lim H. Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) and fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) tea drinking suppresses subjective short-term appetite in overweight women.Burkhard PR, Burkhardt K, Haenggeli CA, Landis T. Plant-induced seizures: reappearance of an old problem.Chakurski I, Matev M, Koichev A, et al. [Treatment of chronic colitis with an herbal combination of Taraxacum officinale, Hipericum perforatum, Melissa officinaliss, Calendula officinalis and Foeniculum vulgare].Falahat F, Ayatiafin S, Jarahi L, et al.

Efficacy of a herbal formulation based on Foeniculum vulgare in oligo/amenorrhea: a randomized clinical trial.The effect of fennel seed powder on estradiol levels, menopausal symptoms, and sexual desire in postmenopausal women.Gral N, Beani JC, Bonnot D, et al. [Plasma levels of psoralens after celery ingestion].Lee HW, Ang L, Lee MS, Alimoradi Z, Kim E.

Fennel for reducing pain in primary dysmenorrhea: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.Mahdavian M, Mirzaii Najmabadi K, Hosseinzadeh H, Mirzaeian S, Badiee Aval S, Esmaeeli H. Effect of the mixed herbal medicines extract (fennel, chamomile, and saffron) on menopause syndrome: a randomized controlled clinical trial.Nadjarzadeh A, Ghadiri-Anari A, Ramezani-Jolfaie N, et al.

Effect of hypocaloric high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet supplemented with fennel on androgenic and anthropometric indices in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome: A randomized placebo-controlled trial.The effect of fennel essential oil on uterine contraction as a model for dysmenorrhea, pharmacology and toxicology study.Pitasawat B, Champakaew D, Choochote W, et al. Aromatic plant-derived essential oil: an alternative larvicide for mosquito control.Portincasa P, Bonfrate L, Scribano ML, et al.

Curcumin and fennel essential oil improve symptoms and quality of life in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.(fennel) on menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women: a randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial.Savino F, Cresi F, Castagno E, et al. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of a standardized extract of Matricariae recutita, Foeniculum vulgare and Melissa officinalis (ColiMil) in the treatment of breastfed colicky infants.Trabace L, Tucci P, Ciuffreda L, et al. "Natural" relief of pregnancy-related symptoms and neonatal outcomes: above all do no harm.Weizman Z, Alkrinawi S, Goldfarb D, et al.

Efficacy of herbal tea preparation in infantile colic.Effect of oral administration of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) on ciprofloxacin absorption and disposition in the rat. .

15 Impressive Benefits of Fennel

Fennel, which has the scientific name Foeniculum vulgare miller, or its essence, is widely used around the world in mouth fresheners, toothpaste, desserts, antacids, and in various culinary applications.Apart from the uses of fennel already mentioned, there are numerous medicinal uses and health benefits, mainly due to the components of its essential oils, which are summarized below.According to the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, fennel bulb is a source of energy, vitamin C, dietary fiber, potassium and other essential minerals like calcium, phosphorus, and sodium.Vitamin C improves general immune system health, produces and repairs skin tissues, helps form collagen, and protects the blood vessel walls as an antioxidant against the harmful effects of free radicals that can frequently lead to heart diseases.Some of the components in the fennel essential oil are probably the stimulants as they encourage secretion of digestive and gastric juices, reduce inflammation in the stomach and intestines, and facilitate proper absorption of nutrients from the food.Fennel is also commonly found in medicines that treat abdominal pain, diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and other intestinal issues.This means that it can stimulate the elimination of damaging LDL or bad cholesterol, which is a major factor in heart diseases, atherosclerosis, and strokes.It shows that, in animal subjects, the extract can not only inhibit the growth of tumors, thanks to its concentrations of flavonoids, alkaloids, and phenols, but it even has the potential to be chemoprotective against the harmful effects of radiation during cancer treatment.Fennel is a very rich source of potassium, which can be an essential nutrient in our bodies and is vital for a number of important processes as per a report published in the Journal of Hypertension.High blood pressure is connected to a wide range of health issues, including heart attack, stroke, and atherosclerosis.Also, for diabetics, blood pressure issues can make the management of their insulin and glucose levels very difficult and can be the cause of many potentially lethal complications.Potassium, found in high levels in fennel bulbs and seeds, is an electrolyte, which means that it can facilitate increased electrical conduction throughout the body.Also, fennel is a vasodilator, which means more oxygen reaches the brain and neural activity can work at optimal functionality.Fennel is helpful in curing diarrhea caused by bacterial infections, as it may have some components such as anethol and cineole which may have disinfectant and antibacterial properties.Fennel being rich in many nutrients including vitamin C helps boost the immune system and protects the body against infections and damage caused by free radicals.Furthermore, fennel is used in a number of consumer products to reduce the effects of PMS, and it is also used traditionally as a soothing pain reliever and relaxing agent for menopausal women.This is due to the abundance of antioxidants (vitamin C and amino acids like arginine are very beneficial for rejuvenation of tissues and the prevention of aging), detoxifiers, and stimulants.By protecting against this destruction of the pigment cells, fennel can safely be classified as effective in eye health for numerous reasons.Fennel is useful in respiratory disorders such as congestion, bronchitis, and cough due to the presence of cineole and anethole, which are expectorant in nature, among their many other virtues.Fennel seeds and powder can help break up phlegm and prompt loosening of the toxins and buildup of the throat and nasal passages for elimination from the body to ensure quick recovery from respiratory conditions.Certain components of the fennel essential oil such as anethol, and a few other chemicals present in the plant itself can be dangerous if ingested in too large a quantity. .

Fennel Benefits Make It a Longevity-Supporting Superstar

Y our kitchen is full of cooking staples that, besides making food taste delicious, are actually Olive oil, our kitchen is full of cooking staples that, besides making food taste delicious, are actually scientifically linked to longevity turmeric , and garlic are a few longevity superstars health experts rave about on a regular basis.Dan Buettner, a longevity expert has seen first-hand how fennel (a flowering plant in the carrot family that has a mild licorice flavor) is used on a regular basis in Sardinia, Italy, a Blue Zone region where people regularly live to be over 100 in good health.Lucina Corhiolu, RD, an Italian registered dietitian who lives in Sardinia, echoes Buettner in saying that fennel is widely used in this longevity hot spot."The fresh, chopped leaves are added at the end of the preparation of soups, like vegetable minestrone, or with legumes.It's also an important ingredient for a winter soup called favata, made with broad beans, cabbage, and pork.We also use them to season meats, in sweets, in the preparation of olives in brine, to flavor brandy or to be used as a digestive liquor, or simply to sip as an herbal tea.".In his new book, The Blue Zones Challenge, Buettner explains that in Sardinia, whole grains, legumes, meat, fish, poultry, olive oil, and a wide range of other herbs are all part of how they eat as well.Both Buettner and Corhiolu are quick to point out that fennel is high in antioxidants, which are linked to supporting both brain and heart health.A scientific article published in the journal BioMed Research International states that fennel stimulates the contraction of the smooth muscles of the trachea, which helps clear out mucus and harmful bacteria.The same scientific article says that fennel has been linked to lowering blood pressure, directly benefiting cardiovascular health.In animal studies, consuming fennel extract has been linked to improving spatial learning and memory.If you want to use fennel to calm an uneasy stomach or as part of a remedy for getting over a cold, simply enjoying it as a tea is a great way to reap the benefits.Marinated olives are a common appetizer in Sardinia and this recipe shows how to incorporate fennel right into the mix.Walnuts aren't typically thought of as a go-to soup ingredient, but incorporating them into your bowl is a great way to add protein.Taralli is an Italian snack food that's similar to breadsticks made with just a few ingredients: flour, water, yeast, olive oil, and...fennel! .

What Is Fennel? Nutrition, Benefits, How to Cook With It, More

(15) More research is needed on this end to determine how effective fennel can be in warding off harmful microbes, such as bacteria and fungi.Not to mention, ingesting essential oils is a controversial practice that most healthcare providers wouldn’t recommend.Some alternative practitioners suggest that fennel may be used instead as a complement to a healthy lifestyle, along with taking supportive herbs such as green coffee bean.(11) It’s important to talk to your doctor about any herbs or essential oils you plan on using, as these may cause adverse reactions in some people and in those on certain medications. .

What Is Fennel Good For? 6 Conditions It Can Help Relieve

While it's not recommended for pregnant women, typical daily doses of fennel are 5 to 7 grams of the seed or 0.1 to 0.6 milliliters of the oil.Fennel is best known for its distinct licorice aroma and taste, yet its ability to ease digestive troubles and monthly menstrual cycles are equally noteworthy.”.Learn how fennel can be beneficial not just in the kitchen but nutritionally as well by providing natural relief of these health conditions:.Cindy Jones, CEO of Colorado Aromatics, uses fennel extract in her Springtide Anti-aging face cream, part of her natural skin care line.The herb contains an anti-inflammatory phytonutrient called anethole, which occurs naturally in fennel, known to have anti-cancer effects by stopping breast cancer cells from growing.Moreover, diets rich in fiber, says Vandana Sheth, RDN, CDE, registered dietitian, nutritionist, and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, have been associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer.“Fennel may act as a carminative, which is a substance that prevents the formation of gas in the gastrointestinal tract, helping colic in babies,” Beth Warren, a registered dietician and nutritionist in Brooklyn, N.Y., told Medical Daily in an email.It’s important to remember because fennel is antispasmodic, it not only causes muscular relaxation, it can also significantly increase the risk of menstrual bleeding.It boosts your metabolism while breaking down fats and reducing water retention, which are known to be the common cause of temporary weight gain.The fennel bulb contains several nutrients, including, iron, phosphorous, calcium, magnesium, manganese, zinc, and vitamin K, which contribute to building and maintaining strong bones.The next time you pick up fennel from your grocery store, remember its use goes beyond the culinary realm and can provide an array of medicinal benefits that promote overall well-being. .

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