However, they can be used in all types of food, and in recent years, Western culture has opened its doors to creative uses of fennel seeds in recipes.Health Benefits In many parts of the world, fennel seeds are used medicinally to treat everything from menstrual cramps to bad gas.Anethole, a major compound found in fennel seeds, has properties that mimic estrogen and may help stimulate milk production.If you’re breastfeeding and have a low milk supply, you may consider asking your doctor if drinking tea made with fennel seeds could be helpful. .

What Are Fennel Seeds and How Do You Cook with Them

Whether you use them for pickling vegetables, seasoning sausage or making a crust for fish or beef fillets, you'll soon realize that aromatic fennel seeds can elevate the most basic recipes.They also offer vitamins, minerals and fiber, so you can feel good about working them into your weekly meal plan.(And just to make things a bit more complicated, the strong, distinctive-tasting star anise—a main ingredient in many Chinese dishes—is from a completely different plant family than both fennel and anise.).In terms of nutrition, fennel seeds are tiny but mighty: They contain minerals like calcium, iron and magnesium, which, among other things, help regulate blood pressure.While ground fennel is also an option, for maximum freshness and flavor it's best to buy whole seeds and grind them yourself at home. .

10 Science-Based Benefits of Fennel and Fennel Seeds

Aside from its many culinary uses, fennel and its seeds offer a wide array of health benefits and may provide antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial effects.Vitamin C also acts as a potent antioxidant in your body, protecting against cellular damage caused by unstable molecules called free radicals ( 3 ).Both the bulb and seeds contain the mineral manganese, which is important for enzyme activation, metabolism, cellular protection, bone development, blood sugar regulation, and wound healing ( 4 ).Finally, the plant compound limonene helps combat free radicals and has been shown to protect rat cells from damage caused by certain chronic diseases ( 9 , 10 ).Summary All parts of the fennel plant are rich in powerful antioxidants like chlorogenic acid, limonene, and quercetin — all of which may benefit health.That said, another study in 47 women found that those who supplemented with 300 mg of fennel extract daily for 12 weeks gained a small amount of weight, compared to a placebo group.For example, including rich sources of potassium in your diet may help reduce high blood pressure, a risk factor for heart disease ( 15 ).May have cancer-fighting properties The wide array of powerful plant compounds in fennel may help protect against chronic diseases, including certain cancers.Negative side effects, such as poor weight gain and difficulty feeding, have also been reported in infants whose mothers drank lactation teas containing fennel ( 21 , 22 , 23 ).Studies show that fennel extract inhibits the growth of potentially harmful bacteria and yeasts, such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans ( 24 ).A review of 10 studies noted that fennel may improve sexual function and satisfaction in menopausal women, as well as relieve hot flashes, vaginal itching, dryness, pain during sex, and sleep disturbances ( 27 ).It’s important to note that many of these studies used concentrated doses of the plant, and it’s unlikely that eating small amounts of fennel or its seeds would offer the same benefits.A study that evaluated the teratogenicity of fennel essential oil showed that high doses may have toxic effects on fetal cells ( 28 ).Although eating fennel and its seeds is likely safe, pregnant women should avoid taking supplements or ingesting the essential oil of this plant.Summary Although eating fennel and its seeds is likely safe, consuming higher doses in supplement form may react with certain medications and is unsafe for pregnant women. .

Fennel Seeds

Candied Fennel Seeds: Add fennel seeds to a mixture of boiling sugar and water, stir until the liquid crystallizes.The flavor of fennel is slightly sweet and has a definite licorice-like taste.Fennel is used in almost every culture; Italians use it on pork roast and in sauces, the French on fish, the Germans in sauerkraut, the Greeks in breads, the Chinese on poultry and people of India not only chew fennel as a breath freshener, but use it as an important ingredient in many curries. .

Benefits of Fennel Seeds for Gas, Plus How to Use Them

Different parts of the fennel plant get used for cooking, and you can usually find its seeds dried in whole or powdered form.Fennel seeds have a recognizable long, thing shape and are pale green or brown in color.They give a sweet licorice-like taste and scent to curries, stews, bread, desserts, and beverages.Chewing fennel seeds is thought to help aid digestion and prevent gas.anti-inflammatory properties This may help get rid of bacteria that can cause gassiness in cases of food poisoning or an upset stomach.Soothing muscles in the stomach and intestines helps to relieve gassiness that’s from constipation or acid reflux.For this reason, you only need to use a teaspoon to 1 tablespoon (about 2 to 6 grams) of dried, whole fennel seeds in most recipes.Add toasted fennel seeds to dishes to give them a sweet, licorice flavor.Make a simple tea by crushing a spoonful of fennel seeds and pouring hot water over them.An research study on animals in 2015 found that high amounts of fennel seed oils raised female hormones in mice. .

9 Health Benefits of Fennel Seeds

A concentrated source of minerals like Copper, Potassium, Calcium, Zinc, Manganese, Vitamin C, Iron, Selenium and Magnesium, the age old practice does much more than simply beat bad breath.From regulating blood pressure to water retention, fennel seeds pack a bevy of nutrients that make it a must have in your kitchen.Helps Regulate Blood Pressure:A study published in the Journal of Food Science, found that chewing on fennel seeds helped increased the nitrite content in saliva, making it a great natural way to keep a check on blood pressure levels.Reduce Water Retention :Drinking fennel tea, regularly helps flush out excess fluids as it works as a diuretic.In addition, fennel seed helps remove toxins and reduces the risk of urinary tract problems.For those with IBS, the volatile oils found in fennel seeds can help kick start digestion by promoting the production of gastric enzymes.For its multitude of gastrointestinal benefits, fennel tea is sure to help the digestive tract be healthy and happy.It is very important to include foods in your diet that help cleanse your blood, to ensure there is smooth absorption of nutrients.It is a good idea to consume a fennel seed drink during the scorching summer, to relieve heat from the body.The oil found in the seeds is carminative in nature, hence it is used in massage blends, especially in Ayurveda to calm the nerves and promote mental clarity.Great for Acne: When fennel seeds are eaten on a regular basis, they provide the body with valuable minerals like zinc, calcium and selenium.She is currently based in Delhi NCR region, successfully running her Nutrition Studio with individual consultations, offering life style programs supported by the most up-to-date clinical research. .

Fennel

[4] It is indigenous to the shores of the Mediterranean but has become widely naturalized in many parts of the world, especially on dry soils near the sea-coast and on riverbanks.Florence fennel or finocchio ( , , Italian: [fiˈnɔkkjo]) is a selection with a swollen, bulb-like stem base that is used as a vegetable.Fennel came into Old English from Old French fenoil which in turn came from Latin faeniculum, a diminutive of faenum, meaning "hay".[7] In Hesiod's Theogony, Prometheus steals the ember of fire from the gods in a hollow fennel stalk.As Old English finule, fennel is one of the nine plants invoked in the pagan Anglo-Saxon Nine Herbs Charm, recorded in the 10th century.Longfellow's 1842 poem "The Goblet of Life" repeatedly refers to the plant and mentions its purported ability to strengthen eyesight:.Above the lower plants it towers, The Fennel with its yellow flowers; And in an earlier age than ours Was gifted with the wondrous powers Lost vision to restore.It is erect, glaucous green, and grows to heights of up to 2.5 metres (8 ft), with hollow stems.The leaves grow up to 40 centimetres (16 in) long; they are finely dissected, with the ultimate segments filiform (threadlike), about 0.5 millimetres (1⁄50 in) wide.Fennel is widely cultivated, both in its native range and elsewhere, for its edible, strongly flavored leaves and fruits.Fennel has become naturalized along roadsides, in pastures, and in other open sites in many regions, including northern Europe, the United States, southern Canada, and much of Asia and Australia.It propagates well by both, root crown and seed, and is considered an invasive species and a weed in Australia[19] and the United States.It appears to do this by outcompeting native species for light, nutrients, and water and perhaps by exuding allelopathic substances that inhibit growth of other plants.[20] In western North America, fennel can be found from the coastal and inland wildland-urban interface east into hill and mountain areas, excluding desert habitats.[21][22] On Santa Cruz Island, California for example, fennel has achieved 50 to 90 percent absolute cover.A raw fennel bulb (235 g) consists of 212 g of water, 2.91 g of protein, 0.47 g of fat, and 17.2 g of carbohydrate (including 7.28 g of dietary fiber and 9.24 g of sugars), providing a total of 72.8 Calories (kcal) of energy.A 100-gram reference amount of fennel fruits provides 1,440 kilojoules (345 kilocalories) of food energy, and is a rich source (20% or more of the Daily Value, DV) of protein, dietary fiber, B vitamins and several dietary minerals, especially calcium, iron, magnesium and manganese, all of which exceed 100% DV (table).Fennel fruits are 52% carbohydrates (including 40% dietary fiber), 15% fat, 16% protein and 9% water (table).Fennel was prized by the ancient Greeks and Romans who used it as medicine, food, and insect repellent.According to Greek mythology, Prometheus used a giant stalk of fennel to carry fire from Mount Olympus to Earth.The bulb is a crisp vegetable that can be sautéed, stewed, braised, grilled, or eaten raw.In many parts of India, roasted fennel fruits are consumed as mukhwas, an after-meal digestive and breath freshener (saunf), or candied as comfit.In Syria and Lebanon, the young leaves are used to make a special kind of egg omelette (along with onions and flour) called ijjeh.Florence fennel is a key ingredient in some Italian salads, often tossed with chicory and avocado, or it can be braised and served as a warm side dish.In Spain, the stems of the fennel plant are used in the preparation of pickled eggplants, berenjenas de Almagro.On account of its aromatic properties, fennel fruit forms one of the ingredients of the well-known compound liquorice powder.Many species in the family Apiaceae or Umbelliferae are superficially similar to fennel, and some, such as poison hemlock, are toxic, so it is unwise, and potentially extremely dangerous, to use any part of any of these plants as a herb or vegetable unless it can be positively identified as being edible.The superficial similarity in appearance between these seeds may have led to a sharing of names and etymology, as in the case of meridian fennel, a term for caraway.Giant fennel (Ferula communis) is a large, coarse plant, with a pungent aroma, which grows wild in the Mediterranean region and is only occasionally grown in gardens elsewhere.In North America, fennel may be found growing in the same habitat and alongside natives osha (Ligusticum porteri) and Lomatium species, useful medicinal relatives in the parsley family.Lomatium species tend to prefer dry rocky soils devoid of organic material.The aromatic character of fennel fruits derives from volatile oils imparting mixed aromas, including trans-anethole and estragole (resembling liquorice), fenchone (mint and camphor), limonene,[36] 1-octen-3-ol (mushroom).[37] Other phytochemicals found in fennel fruits include polyphenols, such as rosmarinic acid and luteolin, among others in minor content. .

8 health benefits of fennel seeds and how to use them

In fact, the majority of Indian families have a common practice of chewing a few fennel seeds after a meal but do you know that it has other health benefits too?In addition, fennel seeds are characterised by powerful antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties that enable them to treat various health conditions.The strong anti-spasmodic and carminative effects of fennel seeds help in treating flatulence, heartburn, bloating and conditions like IBS and GERD.Secondly, due to being a rich source of fibre, fennel seeds provide satiety and reduce hunger which helps avoid overeating.Chewing fennel seeds stimulates the release of nitrite which also acts as a natural remedy to maintain blood pressure.Fennel, being rich in phytoestrogens which mimic the female hormone oestrogen, helps in stimulating and regulating the menstrual cycle.The anethole compound found in fennel seeds is known to improve the protein content of the lens, slowing down the progression of cataract.The anethole present in fennel seeds has natural galactagogue properties that mimic the function of the oestrogen hormone which increases breast milk production in nursing mothers.To reap the amazing benefits of this flavourful herb, incorporate 2 to 3 grams of fennel seeds in your daily diet.Word of Caution: Since fennel is rich in phytoestrogens, pregnant women should avoid consuming it as it might interfere with the normal foetal development. .

Fennel Seeds

People from diverse cultures prefer consuming fennel seeds owing to its various medicinal properties.For instance, Indian families often consume fennel seeds after having their meal for healthier and faster digestion.Fennel seeds are often interlinked to ‘longevity’ and are known for offering a wide range of nutritional properties that aid in improving the well being of a human body.Moreover, fennel seeds offer a concentrated source of different minerals that are vital for the regulation of blood pressure as well as for the retention of water inside our body.One serving of fennel seeds contains 1% of the RDI (Recommended Dietary Intake) for Vitamin C, which acts as a dynamic antioxidant for your body, protecting your skin from any damages caused by the sun, smoke, or pollution.Fennel seeds contain powerful antioxidants and phytonutrients that makes them a highly nutritious source with many health benefits, which are as follows:.The Journal of Food Science published a study which showed that chewing fennel seeds helps in increasing the level of nitrite in saliva.In addition to this, fennel seeds are also rich in potassium which helps in controlling the blood pressure and heart rate.Fennel seeds also offer various ayurvedic properties that help in treating other skin ailments like rashes and dryness.The polyphenol antioxidants in fennel seeds also have anti-inflammatory properties that help in fighting various bacteria and viruses, keeping you safe from various diseases.Consuming one cup of fennel tea, releases essential oils which helps in suppressing hunger.Fennel tea is suggested by many dietitians before meals to suppress the calorie intake for weight loss.Fennel seeds can act as a vital source for curing constipation, bloating, and indigestion as they contain essential oils like anethole, fenchone, and estragole that contributes to the anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic properties.These elements help significantly in breaking down the food in the body, and keeps your digestive system functioning smoothly.Due to the presence of antioxidants, fennel seeds help in neutralizing free radicals that are responsible for developing cancer.Hence, it helps in beating the oxidative stress along with protecting the body from different cancers of the breasts, stomach, and skin.This means that after consuming one serving of fennel seeds, you won’t get hungry anytime soon, which can avoid overeating.Additionally, with the presence of antioxidants, fennel seeds help in improving the body’s absorption power for vitamins and minerals.Grind fennel seeds and cardamom into a fine powder in a food processor or mixer grinder. .

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