Leaves release their refreshing fragrance each time they're touched, making this herb a good choice for planting near outdoor living areas or paths, where you can enjoy its lemony scent.To savor the flavor in regions with cold winters, try growing lemon verbena in a container you can carry indoors.Space lemon verbena plants 12 to 18 inches apart in an area with full sun and fertile soil with excellent drainage; container growing is a great option.Boost the nutrients in your native soil by mixing in several inches of aged compost or other rich organic matter.Full sun yields best growth and the most flavorful leaves, although plants in southernmost and desert regions benefit from light afternoon shade.If plants receive more shade than sun, stems will be spindly and sprawling and leaves will lack strong essential oil levels.In early spring and throughout the growing season, fertilize lemon verbena with Miracle-Gro® Performance Organics® Edibles Plant Nutrition.Lemon verbena typically drops its leaves when temperatures dip below 40 degrees F, entering dormancy.Many gardeners let the weather trigger leaf drop to avoid indoor clean-up and prevent carrying insects inside.Situations that trigger leaf drop include root disturbance, an intense cold draft, quick temperature change, or transplanting.Store butter in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a few weeks, or form into balls and freeze on a cookie sheet.Store frozen balls in zipper bags, using them to flavor vegetables and fish or spread on bread or pancakes. .

Herbs Attract and Support Beneficial Insects in the Garden -

For example, the larval stage of ladybugs, which look like mini alligators, consume aphids, many beetle larvae, and spider mites, among others.Parasitic wasps will destroy tomato hornworms, bagworms, cabbage worms, Japanese beetles, and squash vine borers.The adults–the flies–will “hover” as they drink nectar from dill, fennel, feverfew, lavender, mint, yarrow, and cilantro flowers.Many aromatic, perennial herbs, such as oregano, thyme, and lemon balm, are not eaten by deer and small animals so they become permanent fixtures or “houses” for beneficial insects.However, despite the number of plants in the garden, these insects will only stay if there is a need, i.e., food for them, and if the surroundings are hospitable.Some beneficial insects wait to lay eggs until there is enough “food” so it may be that the appearance of many aphids is the trigger to have ladybugs increase their own population because they now know there is plenty of “food.” In other words, if there a lot of aphids on bearded irises, wait to see if many ladybugs will arrive on the scene to correct the problem before reaching for an insecticide.It is now known that plants that are under attack by bad bugs release chemicals which are signals to the particular type of beneficial insect that would be needed to correct the problem. .

The Lemon Verbena Tales: New Pests and Harvesting Tips

If you are in the northern part of the United States, lemon verbena is only a tender perennial.If you live in the northern part of the United States and if you have the space, you must dig up and bring in your lemon verbena.We are usually scrambling the night of the first frost to dig and put tender herbs into containers!We just discovered today though that the lemon verbena doing the best is being attacked by the brown marmorated stink bug.The slits are causing the lemon verbena to produce new foliage, a good thing.We will make sure to cut these plants to the ground though and destroy the stems to limit the stink bug population next season.I have additional photos and information from the University of Maryland extension website, which has a group of photos showing a couple of the stages of BMSB and more importantly says that the eggs are a light green color and are laid on the underside of leaves.Always look for a university/extension website or your local county extension office when you are looking for solutions to your diseases and insects of your herbs.The Herbal Husband thinks that the stink bug likes the lemon-flavored sap of the lemon verbena.The sting bug is becoming a serious pest of agricultural crops such as fruit and vegetables in the mid-Atlantic states and probably in other parts of the country shortly.There is also the possibility of a predator like the Asian Wasp being able to kill the stink bug.The midrib of the lemon verbena leaf needs to be removed unless the leaves are ground to a powder.I have some additional recipes using lemon verbena in cooking and I will try them out on The Herbal Husband and share them with you.You may have to put plastic wrap on the top and stir it with a spoon or fork occasionally.It is very easily done by hanging branches in the attic, closet or basement and also by placing the leaves on a screen of some kind for good air circulation.Hope if you are going to the MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR on September 25 that you will stop by the Eating Well Stage at 3:00 PM because I will be demonstrating The Zen of Making Herbal Jelly and you will get to try some interesting flavors of herbal jellies. .

Lemon Verbena: Lemon Verbena Spider Mites

The first signs of damage are small light colored specks on the leaves, and in extreme cases these may become discolored and scorched and eventually die and fall off.In warm dry weather (or in a greenhouse) they can multiply rapidly, producing a new generation every couple of weeks. .

Best plants that repel insects: keep bugs at bay with these plants

Whether it is an army of mosquitoes crashing an outdoor party and biting the guests, or aphids munching on prized fruit and veg, it is fair to say that some six-legged visitors are decidedly unwelcome.The best plants that repel insects work in a number of different ways, but usually the foliage contains compounds with a strong aroma which is unpleasant to bugs.Some plants can be grown as a living screen, such as lavender, while others will benefit from being picked, crushed or dried to glean the strongest repellent properties.If you're learning how to grow lavender, you'll be pleased to know that it contains up to 25 per cent of a non-toxic compound called linalool, as well as limonene, which makes it an effective insect deterrent.Any cultivar of the sterile hybrid Lavandula x intermedia is ideal,' says author Tanya Anderson in her book A Woman’s Garden (Cool Springs Press), available at Amazon (opens in new tab).You can also make a spray from the leaves to deter a wide range of insects, including aphids, fleas and flies.It is shade-loving, and it has been used since Medieval times when the dried leaves were strewn over floors to refresh them with the sweet smell of new mown hay.A hardy perennial, tansy grows as tall as 1.2 m in moist, well-drained soil, and it has small, button-shaped yellow flowers.The slightly sticky feel of these cheery bedding plants is the key to their effectiveness as an insect repellent.Trailing ones are perfect for hanging basket ideas and a good cascade of flowers means less insects buzzing around to trouble you.They are a crucial weapon in the war against nasty bugs as they contain chemical compounds called thiopenes in their seeds and roots which repel white flies and other insect pests.Containing citronella, an essential oil which is the main ingredient in insect-repellent candles, lotions and sprays, lemongrass will help to see off biting insects.Lemongrass is suited to container gardening ideas, but may be best for growing in warmer regions, as night time temperature should not fall below 46˚F (8˚C).Those in hotter climes can plant the swishy grass alongside paths or close to seating areas to create a living screen that is also efficient at deterring bugs.Combine essential oils of clove, lemongrass, and geranium with water to create a spray that can help deter wasps from specific areas.It’s not just vampires and werewolves who recoil from garlic, it’s an effective anti-insect weapon when it is made into a spray to keep bugs and aphids away from precious plants.Love or hate the flavor of this culinary herb, it’s a real trooper in the war against insects.It can easily grown from seed, but it does bolt quickly, so sow every couple of weeks to ensure a healthy, consistent supply.As well as helping to keep flies away from the BBQ area, it’s handy to snip a few leaves into salads, marinades and salsas too.As well as including plants that repel insects in your garden, there are some other measures which can be taken to help keep bugs at bay. .

Plants that Deter Unwanted Insects & More

Sweet smelling lavender repels moths, fleas, flies and mosquitoes.Many health benefits have been atributed to this lemon-scented tall perennial grass, including relief from a long list of physical ailments.This perennial herb can be planted in your garden landscape and near windows and doorways to help deter mosquitoes.In addition to deterring mosquitoes, lemon verbena boasts a number of health benefits and is often used medicinally.When planted in a border, it may also help deter other unwanted garden visitors, such as: cats, deer, dogs, gophers, groundhogs, moles, rabbits, snails and snakes. .

Plants That Repel Bugs, Bees, Mice and Other Pests

From flies and mosquitoes to ants, bees and mice, there’s a plant to handle whichever type of pest your yard attracts most.There are lots of beautiful flowers that also serve as natural pesticides, allowing you to simultaneously add aesthetic value to your home while banishing bugs and mice.The distinct scent of marigolds also repels mosquitoes and other backyard pests like rats, tomato worms and squash bugs.Also known as “mums,” chrysanthemums ward off many insects, such as Japanese beetles, fleas, bedbugs, ants, cockroaches and more, thanks to their organically occurring compound called pyrethrins, which is a common ingredient in natural pesticides.The flower petals of chrysanthemums drive away pests, so clear away dead blossoms and leaves to make your mums as potent as possible.Best of all, geraniums grow quickly and thrive in sunny, dry climates, so you can plant them in your vegetable garden or flower beds.Rosemary grows well in many climates and conditions, making it well-suited for pots, Mason jars, herb gardens and other landscaped beds.You can also harness the bug-repelling power of sage by combining it with apple cider vinegar, rosemary and mint to make a DIY insect repellent.Use the essential oils from your catnip to prevent termite tunneling or make a natural insect spray containing vinegar and rosemary.The sweet scent of lavender, although soothing to us, wards off fleas, flies, rodents, spiders, mosquitoes and other pesky insects.Dill sends spiders scurrying away, along with aphids, mites, squash bugs and tomato hornworms, while attracting beautiful butterflies and other beneficial insects.Lemon thyme is much hardier than lemongrass and can survive in dry, rocky and shallow soils, making it perfect for any herb garden or front lawn location.Although planting lemon thyme on its own will not repel mosquitoes or other pests, breaking open its leaves will release bug-repelling chemicals.Be sure to start with a small area of skin to ensure you don’t have an allergic reaction to the plant’s natural properties before slathering your arms in lemon thyme.Oregano’s potent smell is so offensive to rats and mice that you can use its scent to form a protective barrier around anywhere you don’t want rodents to be.Try sprinkling some oregano near your doorways, soil and cracks around the house to successfully deter rats and mice from entering your home.The pale shade of green and soothing scent of dwarf eucalyptus leaves can make any room feel more relaxing.Another miniature alternative to full-grown plants, dwarf citrus trees are ideal natural pest repellents for those who don’t live in a subtropical climate zone.Although lemon verbena can grow quite tall, many people opt to keep the plant indoors so the delicious aroma can fill their homes and deter pests.As a succulent, aloe doesn’t require much attention to thrive — just some cactus potting soil mix and enough water to survive.Because they naturally feed on pests, carnivorous plants devour insects like house flies and mosquitoes, so you don’t have to bust out the bug spray.If you keep finding bugs or rodents in unwanted areas despite planting natural pest repellents, it may be time to call a professional. .

15 Plants That Repel Mosquitoes

Warmer weather brings backyard barbecues, beach days and our most famous uninvited guest: the mosquito.Mosquitoes are also attracted to warm bodies, making humans the prime choice for this little critters dinner, especially in the summertime!Basil brings us delicious pesto sauce and tasty salads, but it can also keep away mosquitoes.This plant is commonly used in jellies, tea and as a delicious garnish for salads and other dishes.Catnip contains the chemical nepetalactone, which is a strong mosquito repellent and feline attractant.Another thing to note is that catnip is easy to care for, but invasive if planted in a garden bed.Citronella is a low maintenance plant, meaning you’ll be able to repel mosquitoes with little work at all.Floss flowers contain a chemical called coumarin that is used in common mosquito repellants.Floss flowers come in blue, pink white and purple and also easily complement any bouquet.Lemon balm is frequently used to help reduce stress, alleviate stomach trouble and more.Keep in mind that lemon balm is an invasive species and can take over your garden bed if planted there.This ornamental plant tastes great in soups and other dishes in addition to fighting off pesky mosquitos!Pregnant women and new moms should stay away from lemongrass because it has been shown to cause birth defects.This fast-grower can easily invade your garden if left unchecked, but it’s not as invasive as other plants in the mint family.You can also toss some rosemary in a fire for an aromatic insect repellent (just keep close to the smoke).Throw some sage leaves in a backyard fire pit or in your fireplace to fill your home with refreshing aromas and a natural mosquito-repelling scent.Geraniums are slightly lemon scented and can keep a handful of pests away from your home and garden.These mosquito-repelling flowers have beautiful blooms and come in vibrant colors that make them great for decorating.Since you know how to successfully deter party-crashing mosquitoes, you can now focus on making your backyard parties and summer getaways the best they can be!Consider having a fun garden party filled with fresh and beautiful flowers and some of your favorite mosquito repelling plants. .

Plants That Repel Pests, Bugs, and Insects Naturally

He believes that consuming nutritious food is the key to a long and healthy life.Mosquitoes and bed bugs cause discomfort by sucking people's blood and spoiling their sleep.It is advisable to find alternative ways to repel harmful insects, bugs, and pests.You may also plant basil in containers and keep them by your picnic table or on your patio.Basil repels mosquitoes, flies, whiteflies, aphids, and hornworms.You may also plant basil in containers and keep them by your picnic table or on your patio.Basil repels mosquitoes, flies, whiteflies, aphids, and hornworms.It repels fleas, flies, rats, white cabbage moths, ants, and mice.It is advisable to place shallow bowls of dried mint leaves in the pantry.It repels fleas, flies, rats, white cabbage moths, ants, and mice.It is advisable to place shallow bowls of dried mint leaves in the pantry.Wormwood repels intestinal worms, moths, earwigs, mice, flies, and slugs.Boughs of wormwood between rows of carrots and onions deter flies.repels intestinal worms, moths, earwigs, mice, flies, and slugs.Boughs of wormwood between rows of carrots and onions deter flies.Pennyroyal is hated by fleas, flies, ants, mice, gnats, and mosquitoes.You may consider placing dried pennyroyal on your pantry shelves.is hated by fleas, flies, ants, mice, gnats, and mosquitoes.You may consider placing dried pennyroyal on your pantry shelves.Bay leaves repel pantry insects like moths, weevils, cockroaches, ants, and flies.It is advisable to place bay leaves in containers of rice, flour, and other dry materials.In fact, one bay leaf in 50 pounds of wheat berries effectively keeps weevils away.Bay leaves protect barley, cornmeal, oatmeal, quinoa, and rice.It is a good idea to use dry bay leaves instead of mothballs.repel pantry insects like moths, weevils, cockroaches, ants, and flies.It is advisable to place bay leaves in containers of rice, flour, and other dry materials.In fact, one bay leaf in 50 pounds of wheat berries effectively keeps weevils away.Bay leaves protect barley, cornmeal, oatmeal, quinoa, and rice.It is a good idea to use dry bay leaves instead of mothballs.Geraniums repel a wide variety of insects like Japanese beetles and mosquitoes.repel a wide variety of insects like Japanese beetles and mosquitoes.Pyrethrum chrysanthemums repel lice, fleas, ticks, bed bugs, cockroaches, ants, and silverfish.repel lice, fleas, ticks, bed bugs, cockroaches, ants, and silverfish.It is a good idea to hang a bundle of lavender in your closet.People grow lavender in their kitchen garden as it protects spinach and lettuce from rabbits.It is a good idea to hang a bundle of lavender in your closet.People grow lavender in their kitchen garden as it protects spinach and lettuce from rabbits.Creeping lemon thyme repels mosquitoes and other insects and pests.Sage repels many garden bugs like moths, ants, slugs, sticks, carrot flies, and cabbage moths that are known to destroy vegetable gardens.Sage repels many garden bugs like moths, ants, slugs, sticks, carrot flies, and cabbage moths that are known to destroy vegetable gardens.Rosemary repels lice, moths, carrot flies, mosquitoes, silverfish, and bean beetles.repels lice, moths, carrot flies, mosquitoes, silverfish, and bean beetles.Chives repel garden pests like aphids, flea beetles, and ants.repel garden pests like aphids, flea beetles, and ants.Onions repel ants, aphids, flea beetles, carrot flies, and mosquitoes.repel ants, aphids, flea beetles, carrot flies, and mosquitoes.Celery is found to be effective against garden pests like white cabbage moths.is found to be effective against garden pests like white cabbage moths.A mixture of two tablespoons of red pepper and six drops of dishwashing soap keep ants away from the kitchen.A mixture of two tablespoons of red pepper and six drops of dishwashing soap keep ants away from the kitchen.Coriander repels red spider mites, moths, and aphids.Fennel controls aphids, slugs, snails, and spider mites.This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.Answer: Even though they do grow in full sun to partial shade, I suggest that you plant them in a sunny area.What can you recommend that won't also repel the adult female from laying eggs on the milkweed?Most plant deterrents appear to be sun loving herbs, so is there anything else I could use.Ants: I am using diatamaceous earth which they dont like as well as taping the base of things and putting vaseline on it, and this seems the best way to stop them climbing up plants and structures.Also try camphor plant, sweet pea, lavender, daffodils and catnip.I plant mint and basil and love them in food but did not realize they are good for repelling insects.If none of the remedies I have mentioned work, it is advisable to contact an expert locally.This is due to the fact, I have a infestation of Japanese beetles and aphids and spider mites.I have used milky spore for 2 years straight with only a small different with population of beetles.I've just seen a site showing carpet beetles feeding off the sweet woodruff plant, with statements by other people saying they've found this also.In your introductory paragraph Srirad you mention Thunderflies (in the UK) but not which plant is the best deterrent.I have a problem with them crawling into my large computer monitor behind the clear and then dying inside to remain there forever...!I grow many of these plants in the garden such as coriander, marigold, thyme, basil, rosemary, nasturtium, chives and mint. .

14 Plants That Repel Spiders Indoors & Outdoors With Little Effort

Lavender is such a beautiful sight to behold, and it smells so good that we include it in many fragrances and air fresheners.A window sill is a great place for since that's a common spider entry point.People will even take mint and let it dry out in tiny satchels that they leave around the baseboards and on window sills to keep the spiders out.Like mint, don't plant lemon balm willy nilly because it'll take over your whole garden.It has a strong smell, one you'll enjoy, but two particular pests don't like it: spiders and fruit flies.This can create an absence of not only spiders but one of their prey, removing an incentive for them being indoors anyways.Just give it plenty of sunlight and make sure the soil can drain so you don't rot the roots, and that's pretty much it.Like peppermint, you can dry out and crush your basil or let it dissolve in alcohol to create a spider repellent spray.Rosemary is a great choice because it's perennial most USDA Plant Hardiness Zones in the USA.You can grow it in a pot or container, meaning it's good for indoors and out.It's an easy choice to grow indoors in small pots to place on a window sill, kitchen counter, and really any specific area where you think spiders are coming through.The leaves and blooms emit a fairly strong scent that pushes spiders away, and look great while they're doing it.But the oil and acids inside this grass that seep out keep spiders at bay big time.Growing them around the perimeter of your house, or even in pots inside or on the porch, not only make for a beautiful lawn but keep tons of insects away.You'll have a lot of color added to your yard, and you'll also attract some sweet insects that won't cause you problems, like butterflies and bees.That makes these a great choice to plant in a vegetable garden, especially if you want to actually eat what you grow.Chrysanthemums run off all kinds of insects, including spiders, due to a chemical compound known as pyrethrin.Plus you can enjoy their fruits and then leave the peels around the areas you're having spider problems and know you have a long lasting deterrent.These typically thrive the best in the south, but you can grow a small tree in a container and drag it indoors during the winter.If you want to do this, consult our best time to plant fruit trees article for more information.You can make your own DIY spider repellent spray by adding about 10 drops of peppermint oil to a quarter teaspoon of dish soap and 12 ounces of water.You'll want to stir the solution lightly but don't shake it until it bubbles or you won't be able to spray it.There's a few more things you can do to reduce the number of spiders inside your house and around in your yard.We're all guilty of stacking stuff and leaving it, or not even inspecting our plants and garbage cans, for instance.You should go move your firewood around, push your bushes around with a rake, and tend to anything else that's been sitting around without any interaction for a while.As you scrolled through the list and images above, I'm sure you thought "wow, these plants all look so nice.Unlike me, your sense of smell is probably intact and you can enjoy their scent on a windy day out on your patio.You can pot them and surround yourself with these plants that repel spiders right on the porch and have one less insect to worry about. .

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