Growing more than 3 metres (10 feet) high in warm climates, it is also grown as a potted plant reaching a height of about 25.4 cm (10 inches). .

How to Grow Lemon Verbena

Common Name Lemon verbena, lemon beebrush, vervain Botanical Name Aloysia citriodora Family Verbenaceae Plant Type Tender perennial in frost-free zones Mature Size 6 ft. where hardy Sun Exposure Full sun Soil Type Rich and moist Soil pH Slightly acidic (6.1 to 7.0) Bloom Time Late summer Hardiness Zones 8-11 (USDA) Native Area Argentina, Chile Toxicity Toxic to cats, dogs, and horses.The fragrance and size of lemon verbena plants make them a valuable addition to the back of the sunny herb border.A site with full sun, rich and well-drained soil, and regular moisture will quickly grow for the harvest.Lemon verbena needs full sun six to eight hours per day, which is typical for a vegetable garden.Plants that are grown indoors as houseplants might need supplemental artificial lighting to prevent lanky growth and leaf drop.A lack of water leads to plant stress, leaf drop, and insect pest infestation.When the top two inches of soil are dry, water and aim for a moisture level that resembles a wrung-out sponge.In its native South America, lemon verbena plants grow in a sunny, frost-free climate.Unlike other herbs, lemon verbena appreciates a regular fertilizing schedule to keep it lush and vigorous.When it comes to lemon-scented herbs, lemon verbena has the most intense oil concentration per square inch of plant material.Add loose potting soil enriched with time-released fertilizer, leaf mold, or compst to ensure a healthy start.Keep the container in full sun, water daily, offer a general fertilizer every few months, and if the pot is outdoors, overwinter it indoors once the temperatures drop to 40 degrees Fahrenheit.Cut plants back by a third to half in early spring to encourage compact, bushier, and thicker growth.Provide the cutting with a humid environment by placing the pot in a large clear plastic bag that is closed at the bottom.Once you feel resistance, take off the plastic bag and continue growing the plant indoors for two more weeks.Help plants prepare for winter by reducing watering a few weeks before the typical onset cooler temperatures.Provide extra winter protection by cutting plants back to within a couple of inches from the ground after the first hard frost and covering the remaining stub with soil.Bring your potted lemon verbena plant indoors or to a greenhouse when temperatures drop below 40 degrees Fahrenheit.Lemon verbena growing outdoors in full sun and rich soil is rarely plagued by pests.When brought indoors to overwinter, spider mites and whiteflies seem to be drawn to the plants as they struggle to acclimate to weaker light and less humidity.But if you have the space for a pot well over 12 inches in diameter, a spot with plenty of sunlight, and you're willing to regularly prune the plant to keep its size in check, you can definitely try growing it indoors.

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Lamiales - Main families

© hcast/stock.adobe.com Members of the mint family are characteristically aromatic, and many are cultivated for their ethereal or essential oils, which are used medicinally, for flavouring foods and beverages, and in perfumery.Mentha cultivars (horticultural varieties) grown commercially for their oils are M. arvensis for menthol, M. gentilis and M.

spicata for spearmint, and M. piperita for peppermint.Culinary herbs include Origanum majorana (marjoram), Origanum vulgare (oregano), Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil), Salvia officinalis (sage), Satureja hortensis (savory), Melissa officinalis (lemon balm), Thymus vulgaris (thyme), and Salvia rosmarinus (rosemary).Border, bedding, and groundcover plants of the mint family include Lavandula, Mentha, and Lamium maculatum (the so-called deadnettle, semievergreen).Ajuga reptans (carpet bugleweed), native to Europe, spreads by stolons (aboveground runners), and A. pyramidalis produces rhizomes to form enlarged colonies vegetatively.Other ornamental mints include numerous species of Salvia, ranging in colour from blue to the orange-red S. splendens (Brazilian scarlet sage).These include Tectona grandis, the teak native to India, Myanmar (Burma), and Malaysia that is also grown in other warm areas for its valuable wood, and Gmelina arborea, an Old World species now widely cultivated for timber and firewood because of its rapid growth.Plantaginaceae One of the biggest upheavals in family circumscriptions resulting from the adoption of the APG classification lies in the reorganization of the former Scrophulariales into Lamiales.The current concept of Plantaginaceae includes Antirrhinum (snapdragon), Veronica (speedwell), Penstemon (beardtongue), Linaria (toadflax), and Digitalis (foxglove), as well as Plantago (plantain) and the aquatic genera Hippuris and Callitriche.The foxgloves Digitalis lanata and D. purpurea are the sources of digoxin and digitoxin, respectively; these drugs are important in the treatment of irregular heart rhythms. .

Growing Lemon Verbena Plants

Leaves release their refreshing fragrance each time they're touched, making this herb a good choice for planting near outdoor living areas or paths, where you can enjoy its lemony scent.To savor the flavor in regions with cold winters, try growing lemon verbena in a container you can carry indoors.Space lemon verbena plants 12 to 18 inches apart in an area with full sun and fertile soil with excellent drainage; container growing is a great option.Boost the nutrients in your native soil by mixing in several inches of aged compost or other rich organic matter.Full sun yields best growth and the most flavorful leaves, although plants in southernmost and desert regions benefit from light afternoon shade.If plants receive more shade than sun, stems will be spindly and sprawling and leaves will lack strong essential oil levels.In early spring and throughout the growing season, fertilize lemon verbena with Miracle-Gro® Performance Organics® Edibles Plant Nutrition.Lemon verbena typically drops its leaves when temperatures dip below 40 degrees F, entering dormancy.Many gardeners let the weather trigger leaf drop to avoid indoor clean-up and prevent carrying insects inside.Situations that trigger leaf drop include root disturbance, an intense cold draft, quick temperature change, or transplanting.Store butter in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a few weeks, or form into balls and freeze on a cookie sheet.Store frozen balls in zipper bags, using them to flavor vegetables and fish or spread on bread or pancakes.Get gardening info on the go with our free app, HOMEGROWN with Bonnie Plants. .

Lemon balm

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis)[note 1] is a perennial herbaceous plant in the mint family and native to south-central Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, Iran, and Central Asia, but now naturalized elsewhere.Melissa officinalis from Flora von Deutschland Österreich und der Schweiz (1885) An illustration offrom(1885).Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) is a perennial herbaceous plant in the mint family Lamiaceae, and native to south-central Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, Iran, and Central Asia, but now naturalized in the Americas and elsewhere.[5] The second name, officinalis (Latin, 'of the shop'), originates from the use of the herb by apothecaries, who sold herbal remedies directly to their customers.It is mentioned by the Greek polymath Theophrastus in his Historia Plantarum, written in c. 300 BC, as "honey-leaf" (μελισσόφυλλον).It was in the herbal garden of the English botanist John Gerard in the 1590s,[page needed] who considered it especially good for feeding and attracting honeybees.Especially cultivated for honey production, according to the authors Janet Dampney and Elizabeth Pomeroy, "bees were thought never to leave a garden in which it was grown".It was introduced to North America by the first colonists from Europe; it was cultivated in the Gardens of Monticello, designed by the American statesman Thomas Jefferson.The English botanist Nicholas Culpeper considered lemon balm to be ruled by the planet Jupiter in Cancer, and suggested it to be used for "weak stomachs", to cause the heart to become "merry", to help digestion, to open "obstructions of the brain", and to expel "melancholy vapors" from the heart and arteries.In traditional Austrian medicine, M.

officinalis leaves have been prescribed as a herbal tea, or as an external application in the form of an essential oil.Lemon balm is the main ingredient of carmelite water, which is sold in German pharmacies.Lemon balm is used as a flavouring[17] in ice cream and herbal teas, often in combination with other herbs such as spearmint.Melissa officinalis is native to Europe, central Asia and Iran, but is now naturalized around the world.In mild temperate zones, the plant stems die off at the start of the winter, but shoot up again in spring.The leaves are harvested by hand in June and August in the northern hemisphere, on a day when the weather is dry, to prevent the crop from turning black if damp.'Aurea' M. officinalis 'Quedlinburger Niederliegende', an improved variety bred for high essential oil content. .

Mint Tea with Lemon Verbena Recipe

The tea arrived in a large, clear, glass teapot, filled with green leaves and hot water.After we finished it, my curiosity got the best of me and I started fishing out the leaves from the pot, wondering what was in this tea anyway?Our server noticed this odd behavior and quickly came to the table offering to provide us with fresh leaves. .

Lemon balm Information

Several studies show that lemon balm combined with other calming herbs (such as valerian, hops, and chamomile) helps reduce anxiety and promote sleep.Some studies suggest that topical ointments containing lemon balm may help heal cold sores caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV).In one study of 116 people with HSV, those who applied lemon balm cream to their lip sores experienced significant improvement in redness and swelling after only 2 days.Another large study involving three German hospitals and one dermatology clinic showed that when lemon balm was used to treat the primary infection of HSV I, not a single recurrence was noted. .

Lemon Balm: Uses, Benefits, and More

The herb is native to Europe, North Africa, and West Asia, but it’s grown around the world.Lemon balm has traditionally been used to improve mood and cognitive function, but the potential benefits don’t stop there.A 2004 study found that taking lemon balm eased the negative mood effects of laboratory-induced psychological stress.Participants who took lemon balm self-reported an increased sense of calmness and reduced feelings of alertness.Participants in both groups reported positive effects on various aspects of mood, including reduced levels of anxiety.The results of these computerized tasks suggest that participants who ingested lemon balm performed better than those who didn’t.Although these participants did experience an increase in levels of alertness and performance, it’s still possible for fatigue to set in over time.The researchers found that the participants who used the lemon balm cream experienced fewer symptoms and healed faster than those who didn’t.The researchers also suggested that using lemon balm cream may help prolong the intervals between cold sore outbreaks.It may help relieve indigestion If you experience frequent abdominal pain and discomfort, lemon balm may have a positive effect on your digestion.A small study from 2010 assessed the effects of a cold dessert containing lemon balm on functional dyspepsia.How to use: Add 1 teaspoon (tsp) of lemon balm powder to a bowl of ice cream or smoothie and enjoy.A 2005 review assessing the results of several studies on lemon balm found the herb to be useful in treating gastrointestinal symptoms such as this.A 2015 study researched the effect of lemon balm in reducing the intensity of cramps in 100 high school girls.It’s also though that ingesting the herb can help to open up and relax tight blood vessels, which can contribute to headaches.How to use: If you experience recurrent headaches, you may find it beneficial take 300 to 600 mg of lemon balm up to three times per day.In addition to drawing on its relaxing properties, this home remedy is thought to target inflammation in the body.How to use: Use a cotton swab to apply lemon balm oil to the affected area as needed.allergic reaction You may be able to minimize side effects, such as stomach upset, by ingesting lemon balm alongside food.You can also reduce your risk for side effects by consuming fewer than 2 grams of lemon balm per day. .

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