It's also relatively easy to grow in a home herb garden and is a nice plant for containers.In some parts of India, lemongrass is considered to be an essential plant in the mind-body medicinal practice of Ayurveda.Fresh or dried lemongrass can be steeped or boiled to make an herbal infusion or decoction.Generally speaking, about one teaspoon of lemongrass leaves per cup of boiling water is a good ratio.At times, you might even find it in Americanized masala chai spice mixtures, especially those that include plenty of ginger.For a soothing hot lemongrass tea, add ginger root along with either mint or cinnamon, or both.When playing with herbal drink recipes, you'll also find that lemongrass pairs well with coconut milk, chili peppers, cucumber, and pear.Try it in recipes like roasted lemongrass chicken, which has a sweet lime sauce, or the zesty Thai lemon-lime shrimp.For something even more unique, try a Thai carrot soup that includes that great combination of ginger and lemongrass.One of the most authentic recipes uses a marinade that is dominated by lemongrass before the skewered meat is grilled to perfection then dipped in a peanut sauce. .

How to Harvest Lemongrass for Cooking and Herbal Tea

When I give my raised bed talks, I usually tell the audience that I like to plant lemongrass in place of a spike or dracaena, in my ornamental pots because it provides that lovely dramatic height.I love drying lemongrass for herbal tea, and come fall, when I fire up the crockpot, I toss it into hearty curries.There are health studies that show lemongrass can reduce inflammation, lower cholesterol, and relieve anxiety, among other benefits.I have found it challenging to grow lemongrass from seed, so I usually purchase plants each year.It doesn’t mind slightly moist soil, but you don’t want to overwater, which can cause the plant to rot.I’ve actually found lemongrass to be pretty drought tolerant compared to other herbs I grow.Wearing gardening gloves, I use my herb scissors to snip the leaves from the base of the outside of the clump to dry for tea.If you’re not saving the whole plant, you can pull it out of the pot in the fall, dust off all the soil, and separate each culm to store for the winter.Wrap them tightly in plastic to freeze, or put into freezer bags, and simply pull out a stalk for cooking as you need it.I find lemongrass stalks to be quite woody and fibrous (I found this out the hard way after biting into a huge piece once in a bowl of coconut soup), so I don’t generally mince it in my dishes.I use pieces of the stalks in chicken curry and Thai coconut soup, but I’ll fish them out before serving.However, do make sure if you want to eventually save all of it (leaves and stalks) for freezing or drying, that you get to it before your region’s first hard frost.I’ll move my pots to the warmth of the garage for a night if I haven’t had a chance to save all the lemongrass beforehand.Put your wee bit of lemongrass in a sunny window and change the water daily (or as often as possible).Lemongrass is a tropical plant, so you’ll want to make sure you’re well past your region’s frost-free date before bringing it back outside in the spring. .

How to Use Lemongrass

Preparing lemongrass was one of the first chores Nite Yun, chef and owner of Oakland’s critically acclaimed Nyum Bai, performed in her mother’s kitchen.As its name suggests, lemongrass is a grass with botanical origins that stretch across South and Southeast Asia, from India and Sri Lanka to Indonesia and the Philippines.“I always prefer fresh lemongrass as the natural oils bring so much flavor and complexity to dishes,” says Gil Payumo, chef at Filipino fusion restaurant Señor Sisig in San Francisco.In South and Southeast Asian cooking, lemongrass commonly conspires with ingredients like garlic, galangal (and/or ginger), cilantro, Thai basil, shallots, lime leaves, and coconut milk to create bold, complex flavors. .

LEMONGRASS: Overview, Uses, Side Effects, Precautions

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Antimicrobial activity of essential oils against Helicobacter pylori.A., de Andrade, P. P., da Silva, N. H., and Figueiredo, R. C.

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Lemongrass Tea: 10 Benefits

Lemongrass essential oil is used in aromatherapy to freshen the air, reduce stress, and uplift the mood.Lemongrass is also used as a folk remedy to promote sleep, relieve pain, and boost immunity.Keep reading to learn how drinking lemongrass tea may help deliver these potential health benefits.Further research found lemongrass oil and silver ions may work together against several types of bacteria and fungus in vitro.It has anti-inflammatory properties Inflammation is thought to play a role in many conditions, including heart disease and stroke.According to the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, two of the main compounds in lemongrass, citral and geranial, are thought to be responsible for its anti-inflammatory benefits.This occurs either by causing cell death directly or boosting your immune system so that your body is better able to fight-off cancer on its own.A 2012 study on rodents published by the National Institutes of Health showed that lemongrass may also be effective against gastric ulcers.The study found that the essential oil of lemongrass leaves can help protect the stomach lining against damage from aspirin and ethanol.A diuretic makes you urinate more often, ridding your body of excess fluid and sodium.Although these findings are exciting if you have high systolic blood pressure, researchers caution that men with heart problems should use lemongrass in moderation.This can help you avoid dangerous drops in heart rate or increased diastolic pressure.A study published in the Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research showed that lemongrass oil extract helped to lower cholesterol in animals.It may help relieve symptoms of PMS Lemongrass tea is used as a natural remedy for menstrual cramps, bloating, and hot flashes.Additionally, according to an article published in the Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research , lemongrass oil is useful in helping to cool the body.For dosing recommendations, consult your doctor or a qualified natural health practitioner.To make sure you get a high-quality, pure product, only buy herbal tea from a reputable manufacturer you trust. .

11 Reasons to Use Lemongrass Essential Oil

Lemongrass oil can be extracted, and it’s been used by healthcare providers to treat digestive problems and high blood pressure.In fact, lemongrass essential oil is a popular tool in aromatherapy to help relieve stress, anxiety, and depression.It has antibacterial properties Lemongrass is used as a natural remedy to heal wounds and help prevent infection.Research from 2010 found that lemongrass essential oil was effective against a variety of drug-resistant bacteria, including those that cause: skin infections.Research has shown that lemongrass essential oil helps hunt free radicals.Researchers suggest it’s a potential complementary therapy for nonsurgical dental procedures and gingivitis.According to a 2012 study on mice, lemongrass essential oil helped prevent gastric ulcers, a common cause of stomach pain.Although most herbal products use dried lemongrass leaves, using the essential oil for aromatherapy may provide similar benefits.The study showed that the oil reduced fecal output in mice with castor oil-induced diarrhea, possibly by slowing intestinal motility.Lemongrass is traditionally used to treat high cholesterol and manage heart disease.For the study, the rats were treated with a daily oral dose of 125 to 500 milligrams of lemongrass oil for 42 days.Serotonin is a hormone that regulates mood, sleep, appetite, and cognitive functions.It’s a good idea to do a patch test before using a diluted essential oil more widely on your skin.Here’s how to perform one: Wash your forearm with mild, unscented soap, then pat the area dry.Apply a few drops of the diluted essential oil to a small patch of skin on your forearm.If you notice any signs of discomfort within the 24 hours, such as redness, blistering, or irritation, remove the bandage and wash your skin with mild soap and water.Some people massage the diluted essential oil into their temples to help relieve headaches.Look for organic oils manufactured by a brand that’s a member of the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy.Possible side effects and risks Lemongrass essential oil is highly concentrated.You shouldn’t ingest lemongrass essential oil unless you are under the care of a healthcare provider who will monitor your treatment.are breastfeeding You shouldn’t use lemongrass as a complementary therapy or in place of your regular treatment for any condition, unless under your doctor’s guidance and supervision. .

Lemongrass tea: Benefits, uses, and recipe

Lemongrass is an herb that is native to Sri Lanka and South India but now grows in many countries around the world.The plant’s stalks are a common ingredient in Asian cooking, but it is also possible to brew lemongrass to make tea.Share on Pinterest Lemongrass tea may have many benefits, including relieving anxiety and preventing infection.Although some people already inhale lemongrass essential oil to relieve stress and anxiety, researchers still need more evidence to be able to confirm this benefit.According to an article in the Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research, consuming lemongrass extracts appears to lower cholesterol in animals.According to the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, study results suggest that lemongrass may have some infection-preventing capabilities.For example, the herb seems to reduce the incidence of thrush, a fungal infection that commonly affects people with weakened immune systems, such as those with HIV.The authors looked at 12 herbs and found that lemongrass herbal extracts were one of the most potent inhibitors of bacterial growth in lab samples.Drinking lemongrass tea can have diuretic effects, which means that it stimulates the kidneys to release more urine than usual.According to a small-scale study in the Journal of Renal Nutrition, drinking lemongrass tea increases urine output more than other beverages. .

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