Also Read: Top 5 Culinary Herbs to Grow, How to Make Italian Seasoning, How to Store Dried Food.Harvest oregano just before the flowers start forming, that’s when it will have the best, most intense flavor.If you have a perennial patch, watch for it to be ready to harvest in early June.Yup, even here in cold, wintery Manitoba, your oregano can be harvested in early June.Mid morning is considered the best time of day to harvest herbs – after any morning dew has evaporated but before the sun causes the essential oils to leave the plant or excessive heat causes wilting.When oregano comes back from previous years, it can grow very quickly and can withstand several harvests in one summer.If you just planted your oregano, it will take a little longer for it to be harvested, but keep an eye on it because it will flower even when it is small.I use kitchen scissors and cut several stems at once, about an inch or two above ground level.Leaves that are bruised or starting to turn yellow don’t have a lot of flavor, so it’s best to remove them at this point.It’s important to remove water droplets or surface moisture from the oregano.So, before you tie your bundles or put them in paper bags, you must remove all surface moisture.I use a salad spinner and then lay out the oregano on a clean towel for an hour or more to remove surface moisture.When the oregano is totally dry and starting to wilt, that’s when you can tie it or bag it.OR, you can toss washed and dry oregano (no surface moisture) loosely into brown paper bags.It may seem obvious what it is now, but by the end of the summer when you’ve harvested a variety of herbs, they all start to look the same.Strip the leaves from the stems and place in a paper bag or glass jar.I know the fluctuating temperature from the stove are not ideal for herbs, but I’m not running to the basement every time I need oregano!Dried oregano, like most herbs will start to lose its flavour after about six months, but I usually continue to use it until next year’s harvest. .

How To Harvest Oregano For Later Use

Originating from Greece’s hilly countryside, oregano was described as the “joy of the mountain” by the local Greeks.Oregano is closely related to sweet marjoram, which is another extremely popular herb.To enjoy an ongoing supply and encourage healthy growth, it is essential to harvest oregano properly.You may start harvesting your oregano plant once the stems grow at least 4 to 5 inches tall.And, as it starts to shift towards flowering, it’s an excellent time to harvest for later drying and long-term storage!Keep in mind that oregano plants take around 2 to 3 weeks to grow back their foliage.The better approach is to harvest your plants regularly, taking small amounts when required.Whether you are harvesting for fresh use or for storage, avoid taking more than 1/3rd of the oregano plant at one time.If you cut back the plant too heavily while harvesting oregano, it may have problems creating new growth.Once you’ve harvested the leaves, trim off the bare stem just above a leaf node so the plant can regenerate.Fresh herbs last longer in colder temperatures, which means refrigerating your bountiful harvest can help increase its lifespan.Place the cut ends in a glass or jar filled with 1 to 1.5 inches of water.Collect harvested stems into a bunch and wrap them loosely in a damp paper towel.Place the wrapped bundle in a plastic bag, pressing out excess air, and keep your herbs in the crisper drawer in the fridge.Make sure to check your herbs every couple days to ensure they’re not starting to wilt or developing any mold.While you can certainly use a dehydrator or an oven to dry the leaves, using high heat in the process can lead to flavor loss.Wash harvested oregano stems and dry them thoroughly, blotting off moisture well with paper towels.The packet will absorb excess moisture and prevent mold development when storing your herb.To freeze whole oregano leaves, wash them and blot them dry using paper towels.Once fully frozen, place them in a freezer bag and remove excess air.Add just enough liquid (either H2O or a broth) to ensure the oregano stays packed together, then freeze overnight. .

How to Grow Oregano Plants

However, its trailing growth also makes it a good seasonal ground cover, or it can serve as a nice edging along a path.In late summer, enjoy Greek or Italian oregano‘s white flowers against its bright-green leaves.For impressive growth and lots of tasty harvests, be sure to start with strong young oregano plants from Bonnie Plants®, the company that has been helping home gardeners grow their own food for over a century.The long stems look great spilling over the edges of containers and also work well as a ground cover.Oregano prefers a sunny spot; however, in zone 7 and farther south, it benefits from a little afternoon shade.So, for best results, you'll also want to feed oregano with Miracle-Gro® Performance Organics® Edibles Plant Nutrition throughout the growing season (follow the directions on the label).Oregano spreads easily; in late spring, cut it back to one-third of its size in order to make the plant bushier.To ensure you have fresh oregano at your fingertips year-round, another great option is to grow it indoors in a water-based (aka hydroponic) system.In the garden it is easy to mistake an oregano plant for look-alike sweet marjoram, although the two are easily distinguished by their flavours and scents.The flavor of oregano is most intense in mid-summer, just before it blooms, making this the best time to harvest leaves for drying.The "secret" ingredient in Aunt Bee's spaghetti sauce, oregano adds deep flavor to Italian or Greek dishes, meat, fish, eggs, cheese, tomatoes, and vegetables such as beans and zucchini. .

How to grow Oregano / RHS Gardening

Cover with a light layer of sieved compost, water and place in a propagator to germinate.For a winter supply of leaves, lift plants in autumn, pot them up and place them in a well lit spot under cover.Grow indoors until early summer or until all danger of frost has passed, then plant in a sunny, sheltered spot in well-drained soil.To dry oregano leaves, hang up sprigs in a dark, well-ventilated place for a few weeks.Forms a dome of mid-green leaves in summer with later purple-pink flowers and then dying back in winter, height 45cm.It’s a hardy perennial with the leaves giving a medium strong flavour to dishes.Growth is similar to common but with a hairy leaf and tiny white flowers.A lemon-scented, lighter green-leaved variety of ‘Common Oregano’ which gives a mild citrus accent to chicken and pork dishes, stuffings, marinades etc.Woody upright stems carry small downy grey-green leaves & tiny white flowers.They suck sap and excrete sticky honeydew, encouraging the growth of black sooty moulds.Use your finger and thumb to squash aphid colonies or use biological control in the greenhouse. .

Drying oregano: Step-by-step instructions

The timing is crucial because if I cut them too early, the flavor isn’t quite up to snuff, but if I cut them too late, four-lined plant bug damage has marred the beautiful foliage and the flower buds have already developed.I give the handful of oregano a few quick, brisk shakes to dislodge any insects and debris, then I wrap the base of the stems with a rubber band.If I’m only drying a few bunches of herbs, I’ll hang them directly on the tea cup hooks, rather than installing the jute twine.My drying oregano is ready in four to six weeks; sometimes sooner if the weather isn’t overly humid. .

How to Plant, Grow, and Harvest Oregano

Oregano leaves are used fresh or dried to flavor many cooked foods including tomatoes, sauces, salad dressings, and marinades for grilled meats.Origanum vulgare hirtum (Lamiaceae—mint family) Origin: Most of Europe and temperate Asia.Most of Europe and temperate Asia Type of plant: Oregano is a herbaceous tender perennial, usually grown as an annual.Oregano has inconspicuous white, lavender, pink or purplish-pink flowers with five equal segments.Best location: Plant oregano in full sun; it will tolerate light shade.Sow oregano indoors as early as 4 weeks before the average last frost date.Oregano can be grown from root divisions taken in fall, overwintered indoors, and set out in spring.Oregano can be grown from root divisions taken in fall, overwintered indoors, and set out in spring.Outdoor planting time: Sow oregano seed in the garden on the average date of the last frost in spring.Sow oregano seed in the garden on the average date of the last frost in spring.Foliar feed oregano by spraying with compost tea or liquid seaweed extract 2 to 3 times during the growing season Mulching: Mulch around oregano with aged compost in hot weather to keep the roots cool and slow soil moisture evaporation.Mulch around oregano with aged compost in hot weather to keep the roots cool and slow soil moisture evaporation.Cut back plants nearly to the ground once or twice in the summer; this will stimulate fresh growth.Cut back plants nearly to the ground once or twice in the summer; this will stimulate fresh growth.Potted oregano can be grown indoors in a bright, sunny window or under fluorescent lights.Potted oregano can be grown indoors in a bright, sunny window or under fluorescent lights.Winter growing: In cold-winter regions, divide plants in fall and over-winter them indoors for re-planting out in spring.Aphids and spider mites may attack oregano but they can be sprayed away with a strong stream of water; a large infestation can be treated with insecticidal soap.Aphids and spider mites may attack oregano but they can be sprayed away with a strong stream of water; a large infestation can be treated with insecticidal soap.When to harvest: Cut fresh leaves as needed once plants are 4 to 6 inches tall.Add oregano to eggs, cheeses, mushrooms, black beans, zucchini, potatoes, and eggplant.Use oregano to flavor roasted and stewed beef, pork, and poultry.Use leaves to flavor tomato sauces, marinated vegetables, roasted peppers, pasta, pizza, and spaghetti.Add oregano to eggs, cheeses, mushrooms, black beans, zucchini, potatoes, and eggplant.Use oregano to flavor roasted and stewed beef, pork, and poultry.Culinary companions: Match oregano with parsley, rosemary, sage, and thyme.Fresh oregano is generally used as a garnish or added at the end of cooking.Dry leaves on a cookie sheet in a barely warm oven for half a day.Dry leaves on a cookie sheet in a barely warm oven for half a day.Stratify oregano seeds for one week then sow indoors; germination in about 7 to 14 days.Division: Divide roots of established plants in spring or autumn and replant.Golden creeping oregano: O. vulgare ’Aureum’ is mild flavored.Dittany of Crete (O. dictamnus) has thick silvery, fuzzy, almost round leaves ¾ inch across.

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