Herb gardens bring fragrance and life to even small spaces, with the added benefit of always having fresh seasonings for your recipes.Indoors, choose a sterile potting soil that includes materials such as peat moss to help with drainage.Picking off the yellow leaves won't hurt the plant, but try to strategically prune it when you harvest the herb for cooking so it's less bushy.When temperatures are high, try moving outdoor plants to more shaded areas or water more often, sometimes daily, until the hot weather passes.Sage (Salvia officinalis), for example, which grows outdoors in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 6 through 9 and indoors throughout the country, needs a soil pH of 5.5 to 6.5.

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Learn About Oregano

The seedling emerges and appears healthy; then it suddenly wilts and dies for no obvious reason.Damping off is caused by a fungus that is active when there is abundant moisture and soils and air temperatures are above 68 degrees F. Typically, this indicates that the soil is too wet or contains high amounts of nitrogen fertilizer.Mint Rust: Small, whitish, slightly raised spots that turn reddish orange or brown.Powdery Mildew: This fungus disease occurs on the top of the leaves in humid weather conditions.Aphids: Greenish, red, black or peach colored sucking insects that can spread disease as they feed on the undersides of leaves.Burpee Recommends: Introduce or attract natural predators into your garden such as lady beetles and wasps who feed on aphids.Leafminers: These insects bore just under the leaf surface causing irregular serpentine lines.Spider Mites: These tiny spider-like pests are about the size of a grain of pepper.They suck on the plant juices removing chlorophyll and injecting toxins which cause white dots on the foliage.Burpee Recommends: Spider mites may be controlled with a forceful spray every other day. .

How to Grow and Care for Cuban Oregano

Coleus amboinicus While its primary common name makes it sound like this plant comes from the Caribbean island, Cuban oregano is a plant known by many other names as well, including Mexican mint, Spanish (or French) thyme, and Indian borage.Coleus plants are semi-succulent perennials or annuals in the mint family, Lamiaceae, of which basil and thyme are also a part.Cuban oregano’s flavor is also similar to that of O. vulgare, but with an added sharp edge of mintiness.Unlike common oregano, C. amboinicus grows from a short, thick stem, and has slightly fleshy, serrated leaves.Though safe for humans to consume, it’s important to know that Cuban oregano – along with all other coleus plants – is toxic to cats, dogs, and horses.Thanks to its pungent smell, it might attract your beloved pets, so consider growing it inside a fenced area.In late winter to mid-spring, the plant blooms with pink, purple, or white flowers that attract bees and butterflies.Drought tolerant once established, Cuban oregano thrives in containers, or in quick-draining soil in the garden or yard.Plan to provide about four to six hours of sunlight every day, preferably in the morning, to keep the leaves from getting sunburned in strong afternoon sunshine.Many species are flashy and fun, with leaves in vibrant, wildly patterned hues of pink and red.The exact history of this plant is murky, but some sources place its origins in the Maluku Islands in Indonesia, which is also where clove (Syzygium aromaticum) and nutmeg trees (Myristica fragrans) are from.I’ve even substituted it in recipes that call for true oregano to add a strong, fresh flavor to a familiar dish.On the Indian subcontinent, the leaves are used as a main ingredient in chutney, and enjoyed raw on bread with butter.In addition to its culinary applications, people in India, Cuba, and elsewhere have long used C.

amboinicus leaves to help soothe fevers, coughs, and symptoms of asthma.In another study, the oil was found to restrict the growth of several types of fungi, including species in the genera Fusarium, Penicillium, and Aspergillus.The fastest way to get started with growing your own Cuban oregano is to purchase a young plant at a nursery.Just as with basil, all you need to propagate cuttings is a clear plastic cup or glass filled with fresh water, and a pair of sharp scissors.Water thoroughly, and keep indoors in a sunny windowsill or outdoors in a greenhouse or other protected area for a month or two, or until the plant shows signs of new growth.Make sure it has drainage holes, and a dish to catch excess water if you’re growing the plants on a porch or patio.The most important thing to note is that Cuban oregano needs loose, well-draining soil in order to thrive.Make a hole in the potting mixture that’s as deep and wide as the root ball you’ll be transplanting.Place the container in an area that gets four to six hours of sunlight, preferably in the morning when the light isn’t strong enough to burn the leaves.Find a spot in your yard or garden that receives four to six hours of morning sun and has loose, well-draining soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5.While C. amboinicus won’t instantly perish if it gets too much sun, it might get sunscald, which can negatively affect the overall health of the plant.Sunscald is essentially plant sunburn, and affected leaves will lose some of their vibrant green color.During the winter, mulch the plant with a three- to six-inch layer of bark chips or straw to help ward off damage from cold snaps.Thanks to its potent scent, antifungal properties, and insect-repelling oils, Cuban oregano isn’t often bothered by pests or diseases.These tiny, nearly microscopic mites spin webbing all over the leaves, an obvious signal of their presence.If you see any spider mite webbing, remove it and spray neem oil on the entire plant every day or two to help prevent reinfestation.Mealybugs suck the juices from the plant and can cause leaf drop and even untimely death, but this can be prevented if you stop the infestation before it gets too big.Remove visible bugs with a strong spray from the hose, and apply insecticidal soap or neem oil to the entire plant every few days.To harvest Cuban oregano, simply take a sharp pair of scissors and cut off a two-inch or longer portion of the main stem.Let the leaves cool completely, and then store them in sealed bags or airtight jars for up to one year.When my family’s in a hurry, I like to use Cuban oregano instead of O. vulgare in this easy 30-minute chicken with creamy mustard sauce from our sister site, Foodal.Add a teaspoon or two of fresh or dried Cuban oregano to the sauce and watch your family’s eyes light up at the amazing flavor! .

Yellow oregano leaves

Yellow oregano leaves are usually a sign that the plant is lacking nitrogen or specifical minerals such as iron.A general all purpose fertilizer like fish emulsion or pelted chicken manure can help to solve low nitrogen levels.Chlorophyll is the bright green pigment that exists in the leaves responsible for allowing the plant to photosynthesize and create its own energy.Oregano plants that lack nitrogen will have lower levels of chlorophyll and the leaves can turn yellow.To prevent yellow leaves on oregano due to the lack of nitrogen dig through some aged cow or chicken manure through the soil before planting.Oregano plants grow best in full sun and if they are getting too much shade they will lack the green color in their leaves.To solve this problem move potted oregano plants into a bright sunny area in late spring and summer.This will avoid any early spring frosts that can damage leaves and give the plant more sun.Oregano plants prefer to dry out between watering rather than grow in consistently wet soil.Excess water can cause the roots to rot and stop the plant from absorbing nutrients.Small green aphids can attack oregano plants sucking their sap and causing leaves to turn yellow.I always like to treat this pest problem by trimming off the affected leaves and spraying down the plant with water.Use neem oil on the plants to treat the pests and wait for 2 weeks before eating the leaves.Apply a 2 inch layer of bark mulch in the warmer months and this will help to keep water in the soil for longer and prevent the plant drying out.Add dilute liquid fertilizer to the oregano plant to give it a nitrogen boost. .

Why are my indoor herbs turning yellow?

When you’re looking forward to eating the herb plants you’ve been tending so lovingly, it can be disheartening when they start fading or turning yellow.Temperature, light conditions, watering issues and a lack of fertilization can all cause yellowing leaves.All you need is a balanced liquid plant food from any garden center, diluted to half strength, and added once a week during your watering.Most indoor herbs only require watering once a week, with the roots staying moist but not soggy.When temperatures are too high, move your plants into areas of the home with slightly more shade.If you’ve had your herb for a long time and it’s only just starting to yellow, it could be rootbound in its pot. .

Plectranthus amboinicus / Cuban Oregano plant Dying :(

It could barely stay up straight so I had to prop it up with a chopstick and some twine and it grew beautifully.I do live in a place where we get snow and it is getting colder out, but it is a indoor plant and has never been subjected to the cold. .

Why Is My Oregano Turning Yellow : Oregano

When your hardy, pest- and disease-resistant herbs like oregano (Origanum vulgare) have problems, the cause most likely lies beneath the soil.If your oregano leaves are turning brown, it's often because of crown and root rot caused by improper growing conditions.This disease occurs at any time of year, but most commonly in the spring as the soil and air temperatures warm up.While one of several fungi cause crown and root rot, improper watering and site location allow the disease to take hold.As the disease progresses, the oregano plant cannot get enough water and nutrients to its canopy through the damaged roots and crown, causing it to look wilted and dead.Here’s the funny thing: Cuban oregano is not true oregano.Instead, it’s Coleus amboinicus, a species of coleus plant.In this guide, you’ll learn all about how to grow C. amboinicus outdoors.What Is Cuban Oregano?You can grow it as an annual outdoors in Zones 6-8, or wherever summer temperatures stay reliably above 60 to 70°F.Unless you’re in Zones 9-11, it might be too cold for the plant to develop enough to bloom and go to seed.Up until recently, C.amboinicus smells like oregano, whereas P. hadiensis might remind you of having a cold (or like having Vicks® VapoRub slathered on your chest, anyway).Many claim it originated in India.I’ve even substituted it in recipes that call for true oregano to add a strong, fresh flavor to a familiar dish.You can chop fresh leaves and use them in any dish you’d make with oregano.But take note that Cuban oregano is much stronger in flavor than O.

vulgare.The fastest way to get started with growing your own Cuban oregano is to purchase a young plant at a nursery.Just as with basil, all you need to propagate cuttings is a clear plastic cup or glass filled with fresh water, and a pair of sharp scissors.Trim the leaves off the bottom two or three inches and place the cutting in the water.Within two to four weeks, you should see new root growth at the bottom of the cutting.When you see about an inch of root growth, fill a six-inch-deep pot with potting mix, create a hole in the center, and gently position the rooted cutting inside.Once established, it’ll be able to weather cold snaps more easily, but you’ll still need to give it some winter protection, especially if you live in Zone 9.The most important thing to note is that Cuban oregano needs loose, well-draining soil in order to thrive.Make a hole in the potting mixture that’s as deep and wide as the root ball you’ll be transplanting.Dig a hole as deep and twice as wide as the root ball of the plant.Carefully remove the plant from its container and set it in the hole.How to Grow.Plan to provide one inch of water about once a week, or whenever the top inch of soil dries out.Sunscald is essentially plant sunburn, and affected leaves will lose some of their vibrant green color.Provide one inch of water per week, and allow the top inch of soil to dry out between waterings.Cuban oregano can be elusive.Cuban Oregano Ready-to-plant rooted cuttings are also available via Amazon.Though the true species plant is most common, you may be able to track down some other cultivars as well.If you see any spider mite webbing, remove it and spray neem oil on the entire plant every day or two to help prevent reinfestation.), which are oval-shaped gray or white bugs that are between 1/20 and 1/5 of an inch in size.To harvest Cuban oregano, simply take a sharp pair of scissors and cut off a two-inch or longer portion of the main stem.Trim the leaves off your cut stem with scissors or simply pluck them off, and enjoy them in your cooking!Add a teaspoon or two of fresh or dried Cuban oregano to the sauce and watch your family’s eyes light up at the amazing flavor!I have a container garden of herbs that's only a couple of months old.I'm not an exprienced gardner and i tend to have a black thumb, so i was upset but not surprised. .

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