Does your new “natural” cat or dog food contain herbs such as rosemary extract, a neurotoxin that can cause neurological problems, seizures and anemia?When Veterinarians reported that a particular pet food caused neurological problems in cats, testing found that one batch lacked Vitamin B1 (thiamine) but the real culprit in cat and dog food ingredients may be rosemary extract, a natural neurotoxin.Seizures, allergies, and brain function problems are on the rise since pet food companies began adding rosemary extracts and other ingredients not meant for carnivores.Holistic practitioners warn that herbal extracts, such as rosemary, sage, thyme, wormwood, dill, and mint, may be “mind-stimulating and “contributors to seizures” and note, they are referring to conditions brought about when these substances are ingested by susceptible humans, not by a dog or cat only a fraction of a human’s weight.Notably, holistic practitioners refer to herbal extracts such as rosemary, sage, thyme, wormwood, dill, and mint, as mind-stimulating contributors to seizures.European researchers found that rosemary interferes with absorption of iron in the diet, resulting in anemia in humans.UMMC states that rosemary oil (extract) should never be taken orally, so it makes no sense to add it to a pet food recipe. .

Rosemary Allergies in Dogs

Blood work will be performed to give the veterinarian an idea of how your dog’s internal organs are functioning.A complete blood count (CBC) and chemistry panel will provide the veterinarian with needed information for proper assessment.Not all veterinarians offer this type of testing; you can discuss it with the clinical team to see if they feel it could be a good diagnostic tool for your pet’s situation.If the response is ‘good’, then the item puts out a wavelength that is compatible with your dog’s blood which means no adverse reactions should occur. .

Is Rosemary Good for Dogs? Science-Backed Answer

Our analysis provides links to NIH studies, which are considered the most reputable source of scientific information on the Internet.One such NIH study was a randomised, controlled clinical evaluation of 69 dogs with behavioural disorders related to anxiety and chronic stress.This NIH study showed that rosemary and its essential oils modulate the electrophysiological properties of recombinant TTCCs (Ca V 3.2) expressed in HEK-293T cells[*].Furthermore, this study suggests rosemary may reduce stress experienced by dogs and may also help protect their brain cells from damage.Another NIH study showed how rosemary may extend long term memory and prevent dimensia in mammals.Simply put, rosemary oil improved several biomarkers in the brain that related to memory and combating dimensia.The carnosic acid and carnosol contained in rosemary were shown to slow the rate of brain cancer growth in dogs.An NIH study found that a daily 25 μg mL dose of rosemary oil (consisting of 70% carnosic acid) reduced cancer cell proliferation by 75%[*].A groundbreaking study by the NIH showed that including rosemary oil in the diet of rats with epilepsy increased their survival rate from 0% to 60%[*].In summary, rosemary extract may help make your dog feel happier, protect their brain against cancer and dementia, and improve their long-term memory. .

Animal Doctor: Chemical additives in pet foods can cause seizures

Because it is a natural colorant (from the seed-pulp of a tropical tree, the Achiote, or lipstick, tree), companies may label their products “all natural, no artificial colors,” and this can lend a false sense of security to consumers who suffer from dye allergies. .

Chemical Additives in Pet Foods Can Cause Seizures

But I would recommend giving 3 mg melatonin before bedtime and a teaspoon of coconut oil in every meal.I hope his recent vaccination history or flea treatment has not caused the seizures.While doing some research online, I discovered that rosemary extract and a dye called red 40 can cause seizures in small dogs.DEAR DR. FOX: As you have written before, red dye 40 may cause seizures in dogs.Because it is a natural colorant (from the seed-pulp of a tropical tree, the Achiote, or lipstick, tree), companies may label their products "all natural, no artificial colors," and this can lend a false sense of security to consumers who suffer from dye allergies.Cat and dog food manufacturers should cease and desist putting red 40, a petrochemical azo dye, in their products, including treats."Natural flavoring," meanwhile, could mean monosodium glutamate (MSG), which can also cause seizures.My advice is to avoid manufactured and colorful kibble and treats and look for organically certified, frozen, freeze-dried or preservative-free canned foods. .

Rosemary in dog food

Although there is some anecdotal evidence to support these claims, there haven't yet been any scientific studies on either issue in dogs so I'm afraid the jury remains out for now. .

Diet and Seizures

A diet that supports the neurological system is not a substitute for veterinary intervention and medication (if required) but it may have several benefits to cats and dogs suffering from seizures.In people, a condition called gluten ataxia has been identified which involves an autoimmune attack on the cerebellum - part of the brain that controls motor functions.These essential Omega-3 fatty acids help maintain the structure and function of the cellular and sub-cellular membranes, as well as support growth of blood vessels and nerves.Research has suggested that oxidative stress resulting from excessive free- radical release is likely implicated in the initiation and progression of epilepsy (Shin et al, 2011).The Arden Grange recipes contain no wheat (as previously discussed), nor do they contain any soya or dairy products - which some parents report as a suspected trigger of their children’s seizures.Again, further research is needed, but is sensible to avoid the more common allergens affecting cats and dogs which include wheat, soya and dairy products.Phytic acid has been demonised as an anti-nutrient, but it normally only represents a problem in vegetarian diets where most of the phosphorous is present in bound phytate form.Animal protein may enhance the absorption of zinc, iron, and copper, and the cooking process breaks down a significant amount of the phytate from the plant sources.It may be wise to avoid wheat and its close relations, but rice and maize (as found in many of the Arden Grange canine recipes) do not contain glutenin and gliadin (the storage proteins that form gluten).Phytic acid has been demonised as an anti-nutrient, but it normally only represents a problem in vegetarian diets where most of the phosphorous is present in bound phytate form.Animal protein may enhance the absorption of zinc, iron, and copper, and the cooking process breaks down a significant amount of the phytate from the plant sources.She says that the claim originated from a small study by Burkhard et al in 1999 implicating some types of essential oils used in aromatherapy as triggers for epileptic seizures in people.The deodorised preparations of rosemary extract used in food are far removed from aromatherapy oils that are inhaled or massaged and are not suitable for internal consumption.Selection of the most suitable product depends on your pet’s age, activity level, appetite, weight status, current diet and any other considerations unique to the individual such as other health conditions that might require special dietary management. .

Merrick

Does your new “natural” cat or dog food contain herbs such as rosemary extract, a neurotoxin that can cause neurological problems, seizures and anemia?Adverse reactions, including seizures, can show up soon after ingestion but symptoms may also be delayed which complicates accurate diagnosis.Holistic practitioners warn that herbal extracts, such as rosemary, sage, thyme, wormwood, dill, and mint, may be “mind-stimulating and “contributors to seizures”MERRICK DOG FOOD IS LOADED with these ingredients! .

Is Rosemary Good For Dogs?

When I first started learning about how to make my pets’ food healthy, there were a few natural ingredients that scared me.And then there was rosemary… A Mediterranean shrub used in a variety of human dishes and also found in many commercial pet foods as a natural preservative, rosemary was being linked to seizures in dogs.What I found is that it all really comes down to how much and in what form you are using rosemary, but generally it is considered safe for dogs – and in fact, has many potential benefits.“Rosemary, in most forms (dried, fresh whole plant, tincture or tea) can be used very safely in dogs, and in fact is Generally Regarded As Safe (GRAS) by FDA for use in both humans and animals,” says herbalist Gregory L. Tilford, co-author with Mary L.

Wulff of Herbs for Pets.“However, the essential oil, which is often used in very small amounts as a natural food preservative is very strong and concentrated.All said, as long as the oil is not used in concentrations greater than 1 percent of the entire composition of a food or supplement product, it can be used quite safely.”.Because of rosemary’s antimicrobial prowess, it can be used in antibacterial skin or eye rinses, to help with minor cuts and burns, and for infections in the mouth area, urinary and digestive tracts.Rosemary also contains antioxidants, which means it can help neutralize cell-damaging free radicals in the body – obviously a good thing.An overabundance of free radicals and resulting cell damage has been linked to age-related illnesses like cardiovascular disease and cancer.Running on grass and tromping through bushes may be your dog’s favorite pastime, but it also leaves him vulnerable to ticks and fleas and other undesirable bugs.Herbs for Pets recommends 1/8 teaspoon of tincture fed orally as a starting dose per 20 pounds of your dog’s weight, up to three times daily. .

R I A C R D M I

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