Sage, Salvia officinalis , is native to the Mediterranean, belonging to the Lamiaceae (mint) family along with oregano, lavender, rosemary, thyme and basil.Sage has a long history of use as a medicinal herb and has been consumed for thousands of years.It doesn’t like to have wet feet, which makes it a good plant for xeriscaping and container gardens.Pineapple sage in particular is a lovely plant to have in your garden purely for the deep crimson flowers that show up in the late summer and fall.They attract butterflies of all sorts and are a great food source for migrating hummingbirds.Sage can aid with digestion, mental disorders, menstrual and fertility issues, as well as soothe coughs and sore throat.Although most of us don’t think of sage until Thanksgiving rolls around, the herb is delicious with roasted potatoes or stewed white beans.Divide plants in spring or fall if they get too big for their current space.Although there are hundreds of sage species and varieties, for culinary and medicinal purposes we recommend just a few to begin with.Some improved varieties include ‘Berggarten’ which rivals lambs ears with its huge leaves, ‘Purpurascens’ featuring smoky purple leaves, ‘Tricolor,’ a variegated form with green, white and purple leaves, and the golden leafed ‘Aurea.’ This species produces blue flowers in summer.This post may contain affiliate links, meaning we may earn a small commission off of any item purchased. .

Growing Sage Plants

Consider planting and growing sage in a container with rosemary, basil, and other Mediterranean herbs for a fragrant mix.While cooks appreciate the distinctive taste and scent of sage, gardeners also enjoy its velvety, evergreen foliage, and delicate blooms.When choosing sage plants to grow, be sure to look for those from Bonnie Plants®, the company that has been helping home gardeners succeed for over a century.Space sage plants 18 to 24 inches apart in an area that gets plenty of sunlight and has rich, well-drained soil with a pH of 6.5 to 7.0.If planting in a garden bed, give your native soil a boost of nutrients by mixing in several inches of aged compost or other rich organic matter.Feed sage regularly with a water-soluble fertilizer like Miracle-Gro® Performance Organics® Edibles Plant Nutrition, following label directions.It's simple to use, even for beginners, and provides sage and other herbs and greens with a truly nurturing growing environment.To give new foliage time to fully mature, leave 2 months between your last big harvest and the first frost of the season.Keep the flowers on the stems to cultivate pretty pods that work well in dried herb arrangements. .

Everything You Need to Know About Growing Sage

While tender herbs, like basil, might die on the first freeze, sage will still be growing strong. .

Your Guide to Planting & Growing a Sage Plant| Gilmour

Culinary superstar sage is a pretty, low shrub with pale, velvet-soft greyish green leaves.A member of the mint family, sage is easy to grow and does well in containers, the ground and indoors.If you’re looking to add a new herb to your mix this year, read on to learn everything you need to know about this hardy, versatile plant.It’s known as a showstopper in fall dishes, complementing pork and poultry, pairing well with lamb and often used in Thanksgiving stuffing.Some people believe sage’s medicinal properties may be good for improving memory and helping resolve stomach ailments.Soft, greenish silvery leaves with purple-bluish flowers make this herbal addition a pleaser in any garden.– Garden sage is one of the most well-known varieties and is also referred to as “common sage.” It’s hardy and can resist even extreme cold during winters, bouncing back each spring.Soft, greenish silvery leaves with purple-bluish flowers make this herbal addition a pleaser in any garden.It has lovely purple, white or blue flower spikes and has several varieties such as “Empire Purple” and “Victoria Blue.” Mexican Bush Sage – Mexican bush sage is drought tolerant and grows 3 – 4 feet.Despite being able to withstand drought conditions, it’s otherwise a tender perennial with white or purple flower spikes.Despite being able to withstand drought conditions, it’s otherwise a tender perennial with white or purple flower spikes.– Pineapple sage is primarily grown as an ornamental plant, but is also widely thought to have medicinal properties.It boasts gorgeous scarlet blooms that produce from late spring through the first frost of the year.– Scarlet sage is an annual that really thrives in full sun, but can also withstand some partial shade as long as it’s planted in well-draining soil.It boasts gorgeous scarlet blooms that produce from late spring through the first frost of the year.From where to plant it, to how to get the best results, just follow our simple step-by-step guide to growing sage for years of enjoyment.If you choose to go the seed route, sow indoors for 6 – 8 weeks before the last frost under a plant light.Sage seeds will take about 3 weeks to germinate, and then you can transplant seedlings to your prepared soil.If you choose to go the seed route, sow indoors for 6 – 8 weeks before the last frost under a plant light.Sage seeds will take about 3 weeks to germinate, and then you can transplant seedlings to your prepared soil.Do not over fertilize if you’re growing for culinary purposes – while you may get faster growth, you will likely lose intensity in flavor.If you’re planting in clay soil, mix in organic matter and sand to provide better drainage.Do not over fertilize if you’re growing for culinary purposes – while you may get faster growth, you will likely lose intensity in flavor.If you’re planting in clay soil, mix in organic matter and sand to provide better drainage.It has a long growing season and is one of the few herbs that doesn’t lose intensity in flavor after flowering.It’s not susceptible to many pest threats, and most often, your only concern may be mildew, which you can avoid by taking care to not overwater.Once or twice during each growing season, do a larger harvest, cutting the stems back no more than about half of the sage plant.Once or twice during each growing season, do a larger harvest, cutting the stems back no more than about half of the sage plant.Hang upside down in a dark, cool, well-ventilated room until bunches are dry and leaves are crisp.As long as properly cared for, harvested and pruned every season, your sage plant can last you many years.However, others note that by cutting back past the woody stems at the end of each growing season, you can get many more years out of this herb. .

Salvia officinalis

It is a member of the mint family Lamiaceae and native to the Mediterranean region, though it has been naturalized in many places throughout the world.It has a long history of medicinal and culinary use, and in modern times it has been used as an ornamental garden plant.The Old World type grows to approximately 60 cm (2 ft) tall and wide, with lavender flowers most common, though they can also be white, pink, or purple.Leaves are grey-green, rugose on the upper side, and nearly white underneath due to the many short soft hairs.Modern cultivars include leaves with purple, rose, cream, and yellow in many variegated combinations.Salvia officinalis has been used since ancient times for warding off evil, snakebites, increasing women's fertility, and more.Pliny the Elder said the latter plant was called salvia by the Romans, and used as a diuretic, a local anesthetic for the skin, a styptic, and for other uses.[6] Walafrid Strabo described it in his poem Hortulus as having a sweet scent and being useful for many human ailments—he went back to the Greek root for the name and called it lelifagus.The plant had a high reputation throughout the Middle Ages, with many sayings referring to its healing properties and value.Dioscorides, Pliny, and Galen all recommended sage as a diuretic, hemostatic, emmenagogue, and tonic.[9] John Gerard's Herball (1597) states that sage "is singularly good for the head and brain, it quickeneth the senses and memory, strengtheneth the sinews, restoreth health to those that have the palsy, and taketh away shakey trembling of the members.[11] It appears in recipes for Four Thieves Vinegar, a blend of herbs which was supposed to ward off the plague.In Britain, sage has for generations been listed as one of the essential herbs, along with parsley, rosemary, and thyme (as in the folk song "Scarborough Fair").[12] It appears in many European cuisines, notably Italian, Balkan and Middle Eastern cookery.Other dishes include pork casserole, Sage Derby cheese and Lincolnshire sausages.Extracts of Salvia officinalis and S. lavandulaefolia are under preliminary research for their potential effects on human brain function.In favourable conditions in the garden, S. officinalis can grow to a substantial size (1 square metre or more), but a number of cultivars are more compact.

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sage

The flowers are borne in spikes and feature tubular two-lipped corollas that are attractive to a variety of pollinators, including bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.Contunico © ZDF Enterprises GmbH, Mainz See all videos for this article Sage has slightly stimulating properties; tea brewed from its leaves has been used as a tonic for centuries. .

10 Reasons to Grow Sage for your Garden, Food, and Health

Savory recipes for roast turkey, stuffing, and squash are at their best when accompanied by the addition of fresh sage.I’ve seen totally neglected and unwatered sage plants no worse for the wear, although they do tend to get a bit woody over the years.Let’s explore some of the many ways growing sage can be beneficial for your garden, your palate, and your physical and mental health.Sage thrives when exposed to lots of direct sunlight and dry heat, this can be achieved outdoors or with the use of indoor planters.Sage plants grow purple and blue flowers throughout the summer months, making them a popular source of nectar for honeybees as well as several species of bumblebee and solitary bee.Sage has an instantly recognizable but hard-to-define flavor profile; it simultaneously tastes of pepper, bitter citrus, and sweetly resinous pine.This combination of flavors makes it a natural pairing for roast poultry, breakfast sausage, squash-based recipes, and pasta topped with fried sage leaves and parmesan.Sage has been valued for its immunity-boosting properties all the way back to the Roman era, where it was used to treat health issues ranging from infertility to snake bites.Sage contains small amounts of thujone, the chemical substance which gives the plant its mildly menthol-like aroma.This can help your body ward off bacteria, fungi, and viruses while also promoting faster recovery time.When taken in the form of cough syrup or tea it can help break down excess mucus commonly associated with colds or the flu.Burning or smudging sage is a ritual practiced by some Indigenous American cultures to promote sleep and lessen the effects of stress.Sage is valued for its ability to help promote healthier, shinier and thicker hair when used externally in the form of shampoo or conditioner.Because sage has both antimicrobial and antifungal properties it makes an effective and invigorating addition to cleansers if you perspire heavily or have oily or acne-prone skin.Sage is particularly helpful for removing makeup and bacteria after a long day without stripping your face of its natural oils.This step-by-step guide to making a sage and apple cider vinegar cleansing bar will leave your skin feeling deeply clean and nourished all day long.You can make your own sage tea with mint and cardamom pods to ease nausea and to promote a healthy appetite after illness. .

How to Grow Sage

You can start planting seeds one to two weeks prior to your area's last spring frost date.Only lightly cover seeds with soil, and position nursery plants at the same depth they were in their previous container.For the best flavor, provide your sage with full sun, meaning at least six hours of direct sunlight per day.However, in zone 8 and higher, your sage will likely prefer some afternoon shade, especially in hot weather.In areas with high humidity, make sure there's enough air flow around the plants to help prevent fungal growth.Sage plants aren’t heavy feeders, and too much fertilizer can result in weaker flavor.You can use an organic fertilizer for edible plants in the spring, or simply work some compost into the soil.Sage is pollinated primarily by bees and butterflies and is excellent at attracting these beneficial insects to the garden.There are several types of sage that vary in their appearance and use, with some being grown primarily for culinary purposes and others kept for ornamental value.And marjoram provides a very similar flavor to sage in recipes, though it tends to be milder.Stop harvesting about two months before your projected first fall frost, so the plant doesn’t put out tender new growth that can be damaged.You can pick off individual leaves by hand as needed, or trim off sprigs of the stem.Growing sage in a pot is ideal if you don’t have the right soil or light conditions in a garden.You can easily move pots as needed to ensure proper sunlight exposure.Unglazed clay is a good material, as it will allow excess soil moisture to evaporate through its walls.The stems of sage plants tend to become woody and produce less flavorful leaves over the years.Plant the cut end in a small container of moist soilless potting mix.Place the container in bright, indirect light, and keep the soil moist but not soggy.Gently tug the stem; if you feel resistance you’ll know it has rooted and can be planted outside.Plant seeds only about 1/8 inch deep in moist garden soil or seed-starting mix.But if you begin to see roots growing out the drainage holes, move your plant to one pot size up.Powdery mildew also can occur in wet conditions, but ensuring that there’s good air circulation around the plants can help prevent this.Common garden pests including whiteflies, aphids, and spider mites also might affect plants. .

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