Kitchen herbs like parsley, oregano, rosemary, sage, and thyme are commonly grown in the home garden, but many enthusiasts miss out on the delights of winter savory.A perennial evergreen, S. montana has a much longer season than its close cousin summer savory (S. hortensis) – which you can read all about here.Low maintenance and easy to grow, it’s also a versatile performer in the kitchen – and year-round convenience is what gives S.

montana its must-have status in my garden.A freshly picked sprig added to a simmering pot of beans or stew makes a cold winter’s day seem just a little bit warmer!The glossy, 1-inch leaves are dense, slender, slightly leathery, and highly aromatic, appearing opposite on the stems.Small, dainty flowers appear on terminal spikes throughout summer in colors of mauve, pink, and white.The closely related summer species, S. hortensis, is a fast-growing annual, with a less intense and fresher flavor than S.

montana.Aptly named, savory comes from the from the old Latin root word sapor, which became the Old French savoure – for tasty or fragrant.It was the Roman poet Virgil who recommended planting it near beehives, and in “The Complete Herbal,” Nicolas Culpeper favors it as a stimulant to “quicken the dull spirits.”.Introduced to Europe by the Romans, medieval walled gardens grew both the summer and winter species, and it was used to stuff meats and poultry.The Germans discovered that fresh sprigs added to a cooking pot of beans made them easier to digest.During the economic expansion of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, French and English garden designers of the day recommended planting this herb for its fragrance.When the seedlings have at least four sets of true leaves, transplant to containers or the herb garden – provided there’s no risk of frost.Enrich the planting soil with a mix of 1/3 organic matter such as aged compost or well-rotted manure, and 1/3 coarse sand or grit to improve drainage.Apply a top dressing of organic matter like compost in spring but avoid liquid fertilizers – savory’s flavor is improved when grown in lean soil.If temperatures in your region regularly dip to this mark, select a sheltered planting site and provide cold insulation during the winter months.A thick, 4- to 5-inch-thick straw mulch spread over the crown and out to the drip line will help protect against freezing temperatures and drying winds.Older plants can become woody and benefit from regular pruning to encourage new growth and a full, bushy form.To bring plants indoors for winter, provide a pot measuring at least 12 inches in diameter and with a similar depth.Water lightly when the top inch of soil is dry, and ensure plants are well-spaced in the pot with ample air circulation.To dry, bundle stems with kitchen twine and hang them in a cool, airy spot out of direct sunlight.In the kitchen, flavorful leaves can be used fresh or dried in numerous recipes, typically to season fish, game, meat, and poultry, as well as in soups, stews, and stuffing.Plant Type: Semi-woody herb, perennial Tolerance: Deer and rabbit resistant, drought, poor and rocky soil Native To: Mediterranean Basin and southwest Asia Water Needs: Low to moderate Hardiness (USDA Zone): 6-9 Maintenance: Moderate Season: Evergreen Soil Type: Average to lean fertility Exposure: Full sun Soil pH: Neutral, 6.0-8.0 Time to Maturity: 90 days Soil Drainage: Well-draining Spacing: 12-15 inches Companion Planting: Beans, cabbage, onions, roses Planting Depth: Deep as root ball Attracts: Honey bees Height: 12-15 inches Family: Lamiaceae Spread: 12-24 inches Genus: Satureja Pests & Diseases: No serious pest or disease problems Species: S. montana.

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As winter approaches, grow your own Winter Savory

Sweet food tastes like sugar or honey, while savory dishes are stronger flavored or spicy.Pliny called the genus “Satureja,” from the word "satyr," the half-goat and half-man beast that delighted in all things decadent.Winter Savory is a hardy perennial with tiny white flowers that bloom in late summer.Use the leaves to add a bold, spicy flavor to beans, mushrooms, stuffings, and roasts, and to season meat, fish or vegetables.Its strong aroma repels pests such as mosquitoes, yet attracts beneficial insects such as bees and other pollinators.Winter Savory grows best in full sun, in poor soil that drains well.As with all herbs, it is best to pick Winter Savory in the morning when its essential oils are strongest and most concentrated. .

How to Plant, Grow, and Harvest Savory

Summer savory is a bushy annual that grows 12 to 18 inches high.Winter savory is spreading perennial that grows 6 to 12 inches high.Put summer savory in cooking water and it will cut the odors of cabbage, turnips, and other strong-smelling vegetables.Summer savory can tolerate heat but not cold; winter savory can tolerate both heat and cold to 10° Plant form and size: Summer savory grows upright to 18 inches in a loose, open fashion; it has narrow, aromatic leaves to 1½ inches long; leaves grow in pairs along the stem.Winer savory has a lower spreading growth habit; stems grow 6 to 15 inches high and are light green at the upper ends but become brown and woody at the base; leaves are narrow to roundish to 1 inch long.Summer savory grows upright to 18 inches in a loose, open fashion; it has narrow, aromatic leaves to 1½ inches long; leaves grow in pairs along the stem.Winer savory has a lower spreading growth habit; stems grow 6 to 15 inches high and are light green at the upper ends but become brown and woody at the base; leaves are narrow to roundish to 1 inch long.Both have loose spikes of tiny white, pink, or pale lavender flowers.Best location: Plant both summer and winter savory in full sun.Sow savory in the garden in spring about the time of the average last frost date.Companion planting: Grow summer savory with beans and tomatoes.Grow winter savory with other perennials including hyssop, lavender, thyme, and sage.Protect winter savory from freezing temperatures with a thick mulch of dried leaves or straw.Care: Summer savory grows so quickly that it can become top-heavy and may require staking.Winter savory is a perennial; it should be cut back to a few inches tall each spring and replanted every 4 to 5 years.Winter savory is a perennial; it should be cut back to a few inches tall each spring and replanted every 4 to 5 years.Protect plants in winter with a thick mulch of chopped leaves or straw.Flavor and aroma: Summer savory has a taste similar to thyme with a bit of a peppery bite.Summer savory has a taste similar to thyme with a bit of a peppery bite.Use leaves with lentils, eggs, vegetables, sausages, beef, pork, poultry, fish, teas, butter, vinegar, and jellies.Add fresh savory leaves to season soups, stews, cabbage, potatoes, and other root crops.Use leaves with lentils, eggs, vegetables, sausages, beef, pork, poultry, fish, teas, butter, vinegar, and jellies.Leaves can be dried in a hanging mesh bag or in the refrigerator on a paper towel-lined tray.Strip leaves from stems and dry on a screen in a cool, shady place.Leaves can be dried in a hanging mesh bag or in the refrigerator on a paper towel-lined tray.Start winter savory in summer from root cuttings 4 to 6 inches long placed in moist potting mix or sand.Division: Divide older winter savory plants in spring or fall.Divide older winter savory plants in spring or fall.Layering: Long winter savory stems can be weighed to the ground and covered with soil to root. .

Winter savory

Species of flowering plant.Micromeria montana (L.) Rchb.Satureja brevis Jord.Satureja flexuosa Jord.Satureja montana var.Satureja montana var.Satureja montana subsp.montana Satureja montana var.Satureja montana f. subquadrangula.Moench Saturiastrum montanum.Satureja montana (winter savory or mountain savory), is a perennial, semi-evergreen herb in the family Lamiaceae, native to warm temperate regions of southern Europe, the Mediterranean, and Africa.It has dark green leaves and summer flowers ranging from pale lavender, or pink to white.The closely related plant, summer savory (Satureja hortensis L.) is an annual plant.[11] Also commonly known as 'mountain savory'.It can be used within a herb garden as an edging plant.[15] S.

montana 'Prostrate White' is a small white flowered form.Culinary uses [ edit ].In cooking, winter savory has a reputation for going very well with both beans and meats,[17] very often lighter meats such as chicken or turkey, and can be used in stuffing.Medicinal uses [ edit ].[17] The plant has a stronger action than the closely related summer savory.The plant is harvested in the summer when in flower and can be used fresh or dried. .

Satureja montana Winter Savory

It is an herbal mystery why Winter Savory is relatively unknown when for hundreds of years both Winter and Summer Savory have been grown and used, virtually side by side.Winter Savory's growth cycle starts in early spring as it emerges from the ground with lush, flavorful, rapidly-growing stems.Supple sprigs that push up from the ground and new side shoots off the older woody stems are perfect for fresh or dried use.Winter Savory is a great mixing herb.It blends well with different culinary oreganos, thymes and basils and can be added to meat, poultry or fish.Add to ground Turkey or Pork with Fennel Seed, Cayenne Pepper, and Thyme.2 Teaspoons each Fresh Thyme, Oregano.and Winter Savory, coarsely chopped.For Pork, add fresh mint to the White Wine Marinade.For Fish, use lemon juice and the Winter Savory chopped fine.fresh finely minced Winter Savory.2 1/2 c. cooked diced chicken.Toss together chicken, celery, pecans, olives, salt and pepper, pasta and peas.Winter Savory Stuffing.dried Winter Savory.Turkey can be basted with more melted butter and Burgundy wine (combined) which will make a delicious tasting gravy.

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Winter Savory

Winter Savory (Satureja montana) - Key Growing Information.Cut back the plant in the autumn, and pinch out new shoots in the spring to encourage a full habit.Winter Savory can also be propagated by root division in autumn or spring. .

Summer savory

It grows to around 30 to 60 cm (1 to 2 ft) in height and has very slender, bronze-green leaves.It is also widely used as a seasoning for grilled meats and barbecues, as well as in stews and sauces.Summer savory is preferred over winter savory for use in sausages because of its sweeter, more delicate aroma.When the plants are in flower, they may be pulled up and dried for winter use. .

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